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9 results for Birds--Conservation
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Record #:
34387
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nick Hill’s life and career has been dedicated to the conservation and breeding of the world’s rare and endangered birds. Hill is the Curator of Birds at the Sylvan Heights Avian Breeding Center, the private aviculture and conservation facility behind Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck.
Source:
Record #:
28524
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brown-Headed Nuthatch (Sitta pusilla) and Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica) are both losing their habitat due to human progress. Many electric co-op members are working to reverse that trend by building birdhouses and nesting places for them. The efforts to provide homes for the birds are detailed.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 8, August 2016, p16-17
Record #:
38142
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pictured parrots such as the South American Macaw have a reputation at Sylvan Heights Bird Park that's seemingly oxymoron by nature. Beauty can be perceived in their multi-colored plumage. The on-site perches and benches are vulnerable to their beaks and talons’ destructive potential.
Record #:
38148
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since 2006, Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park has experienced changes that go beyond its name, Sylvan Height Bird Park. Numerical growth is represented in fifty visitors a day to five hundred, staff of less than ten to triple the number, and a few exotic breeds to 2,000 plus birds. Its original five aviaries have expanded to nature trails, a playground, educational programs, and interactive exhibits such as the Landing Zone and Wings of the Tropics.
Record #:
35897
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reports of Canadian Goose retreating the Great North Way for Deep South go back at least a few centuries. It began with John Lawson’s accounts written during the early 1700s. With his as a touchstone, publications persisted through the early twentieth century. More recent sightings have been confined to the Carolinas, with locally bred varieties the last of this bird species.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p68, 65
Record #:
35769
Author(s):
Abstract:
The hobby the hobby hoped readers would fall into was birdwatching. Helping to make this pastime seem more enjoyable were tips such as optimal feeds and feeding stations. Contained also were birds to expect and types of seed they prefer. At the end of the article were a list of books with more information and insights about this entertaining and enlightening activity.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p22-23
Record #:
35651
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thinking like one included creating a conducive environment, which included providing nesting boxes and a favorable habitat. Providing a conducive environment may help to assure the survival of this bird, who was on the brink of extinction from the late 1930s to early 1970s.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 3, May/June 1978, p40-42
Record #:
38318
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the end of hunting season, the author suggests sprucing up the habitats of game birds and game animals to ensure a good hunting season next year.
Record #:
38157
Author(s):
Abstract:
As part of the feature ‘backyard conservation,” homemade bird baths are a great way to encourage bird conservation.