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11 results for Bentonville, Battle of, N.C., 1865
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Record #:
2594
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The Bentonville Battlefield State Historic Site in Johnston County has acquired 3.5 acres of the battlefield. The acreage contains trenches forming part of the main Union line during the battle.
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Record #:
3034
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Bentonville Battleground was designated a National Historic Landmark on June 19, 1996, by Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt. The Civil War battle was the largest ever fought in the state.
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Record #:
4480
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The Battle of Bentonville in Johnston County, fought in the spring of 1865, was the last great battle of the Civil War and the largest ever fought in North Carolina. On March 18-19, 2000, around 3,500 reenactors with twenty artillery pieces will recreate parts of the battle in observance of its 135th anniversary.
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Record #:
4636
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On March 18-19, 2000, thirty-seven hundred Civil War reenactors portraying Confederate and Union soldiers commemorated the Battle of Bentonville in Johnston County. Bentonville is the state's largest Civil War battle reenactment and is staged only once every five years.
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Record #:
12341
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The trenches on the Bentonville Battleground State Historic Site provide a visual testament to North Carolina's bloodiest Civil War battle. Some 90,000 Northern and Southern soldiers clashed there in March of 1865, with 4,243 casualties the result. The Confederacy's last hope required that General Johnston stop General Sherman in Bentonville. General Lee surrendered shortly after Johnston's retreat.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 5, Oct 1974, p14-15, il
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Record #:
12628
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At Bentonville, a brilliant group of Confederate officers led a dwindling army against Sherman's hordes, and a desperate gamble almost succeeded. Author Manly Wellman describes the modern day terrain of the battlefield, adding a map for emphasis, while outlining the battle -- possibly the last blow for Confederate freedom in North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p99-100, 130, map
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Record #:
14691
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Bentonville, in Johnston County, was a Civil War battle marking the largest conflict in the state's history. A three day battle saw Union General Sherman clashing with Confederate troops led by General Joseph E. Johnston. From Sunday 19 to Tuesday 21, 1865 opposing forces fought in the last major conflict of the Civil War. Memorials were erected on the site to memorialize the thousands of casualties that fell during battle.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 48, Apr 1947, p3, 18, il
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Record #:
15530
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The greatest battle ever fought on the state's soil occurred at Bentonville March 19-21, 1865, when the army of General Joseph Johnston clashed with General William Sherman's. Sherman was driving toward Raleigh to capture it and end the war. Efforts are now being made to preserve this historic battlefield.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 42, Mar 1935, p7, 24, il
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Record #:
15694
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March 20-21, 2010 marked the 145th anniversary of the Bentonville Battle. Civil War enthusiasts reenacted the \"Fight for Morris Farm\" and the \"Last Grand Charge of the Army of Tennessee and Morgan's Stand.\" Bentonville is the state's largest Civil War battlefield and the location of one of the last large-scale engagements of the war.
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Record #:
20228
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Charged with the task of stemming General W.T. Sherman's sweep northward, General Joseph E. Johnston struggled to meet in the invading army with enough troops, but he made his stand near the village of Bentonville.
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Record #:
24569
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The Battle of Bentonville was the largest land battle fought in North Carolina during the American Civil War and the only full-scale Confederate attempt to stop General Sherman after Atlanta. This article discusses the battle and the Harper House, which served as a field hospital during the battle and is now open to the public as a museum.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 21, April 1972, p14-15, il, por
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