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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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17 results for "Tweetsie Railroad (Blowing Rock)"
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Record #:
24199
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Amidst skyrocketing land values and a building boom, many fear that the tourism industry in the western highlands could suffer. Places like the Blue Ridge Parkway and Tweetsie Railroad have seen a decline in tourism the past couple of years.
Record #:
29774
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Built in the 1880s to expedite shipping of minerals and timber, the railroads in western North Carolina now serve as tourist attractions. Tweetsie Railroad attracts visitors and employs more than 300 local residents, while the Great Smoky Mountain Railway runs more than 200,000 passengers on excursion runs every year.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 9, Sept 2008, p50-51, por
Record #:
32311
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Grover C. Robbins of Watauga County is the founder of the Carolina-Caribbean Corporation. Some of Robbins’ development ventures have included the Tweetsie Railroad in Blowing Rock, construction of a monorail transportation system in the Beech Mountain resort area, and residential developments near Charlotte. This article describes Robbins’ background, business successes, and future development plans in western North Carolina.
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Record #:
32604
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Spencer Robbins and his brothers Grover and Harry Robbins are known for their development ventures in the Blowing Rock area. The Robbins brothers converted the Tweetsie railroad into a tourist attraction, and developed ski slopes on Beech Mountain. This article discusses the history of the Robbins’ business ventures, and highlights Spencer’s contributions.
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Record #:
23831
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Tweetsie Railroad transformed Boone, North Carolina from an isolated mountain hamlet into a boomtown by transporting passengers, mail, and goods between East Tennessee and Western North Carolina. The author discusses the history of the railroad that now serves solely as an amusement park.
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Record #:
5887
Abstract:
Many people think theme park when they hear the words Tweetsie Railroad in Blowing Rock, but there actually was a Tweetsie Railroad. Bourknight discusses the line that dates back to 1866 and linked Eastern Tennessee with Western North Carolina. The locomotive that pulls the train at the park is the original engine No. 12 that was purchased from cowboy actor Gene Autry in 1956, restored, and brought to Blowing Rock.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 2, July 2003, p68-70, 72, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24066
Abstract:
Tweetsie Railroad has been a vital part of Western North Carolina culture since it was part of the East Tennessee & Western North Carolina Railroad in the early-twentieth century. Today the railroad and the theme park are intertwined, as they have been since the re-opening of the tracks as a tourist attraction in 1957.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 5, October 2015, p150-152, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
32608
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The late Grover C. Robbins, Jr. renovated the Tweetsie locomotive and railroad in 1957, turning it into Blowing Rock’s most popular tourist attraction. The route of what came to be known as Tweetsie was the Linville River Railway division of East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad. The train now operates along a closed circuit and is maintained by Frank Coffey.
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Record #:
6562
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Many people think theme park when they hear the words Tweetsie Railroad in Blowing Rock, but there actually was a Tweetsie Railroad. Johnson discusses the line that linked Eastern Tennessee with Western North Carolina in the 19th- and 20th-centuries and what lead to its demise.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 5, July 1980, p60-62, il
Record #:
24532
Author(s):
Abstract:
One section of the historic East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad is being saved and put to recreational use by taking tourists on rides through some of the most dramatic and beautiful sections of the track.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 6, November 1977, p18-20, il
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Record #:
24454
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This article presents passenger routes in North Carolina, such as Tweetsie Railroad, that serve as tourist attractions and relics of North Carolina’s past.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 12, May 1991, p24-29, il
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Record #:
20796
Author(s):
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This is an article looks at the history of \"Tweetsie,\" a railroad that connected Johnson City, Tennessee to Boone, North Carolina. Information on the author's research and writing on \"Tweetsie\" as well as the author's feelings on the importance of \"Tweetsie\" are provided.
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Record #:
13953
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Tweetsie, the short, narrow-gauged railroad that has connected Eastern Tennessee and Western North Carolina for almost 70 years, will be no more after this month.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 19, Oct 1950, p6, 18, f
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Record #:
32989
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One of the “Cleanest” counties in North Carolina. And if you read on you’ll see just exactly what we mean by the use of that word. The author describes his tour of Watauga lead by one of the county’s old-timers.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 12, Aug 1942, p3-4, 16, il
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Record #:
13056
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Tweetsie was the nickname given the East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railway, which ran between Boone and Johnson City until 1940. The Tweetsie negotiated 66 miles of track carrying almost anything from chestnuts to iron ore. In 1946 the rail was taken up for scrap during the war, but some of her legacy remains as Gene Autry added the last engine to his collection and at least two box cars serve as refreshment stands and diners.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 2, June 1955, p12-13, f
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