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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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32 results for "Tourist trade"
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Record #:
3672
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Abstract:
Coastal Carolina has hundreds of miles of beaches, from the Outer Banks to Wilmington, that offer vacationing newcomers and old-timers numerous activities and places to enjoy and explore.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 4, Apr 1998, p34-37,39, il
Record #:
3680
Author(s):
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The Coastal Waters Heritage Tourism Council seeks to attract many of the 20,000 boaters on the Intracoastal Waterway to stop along the way and visit historic and cultural sites, including Edenton and New Bern.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 1998, p20-23, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4001
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Partnership for the Sounds, founded in 1993 and based in Columbia, seeks to interest tourists traveling to the beaches in eco-tourism in Tyrrell, Hyde, Beaufort, and Bertie Counties.
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Record #:
4127
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Heritage tourism, or visiting an area for cultural enrichment, enables towns of any size to market their existing attributes. From tiny Milton, with 400 people, to Charlotte, with hundreds of thousands, each city has history and culture to showcase. Towns can offer such niche interests as flowers, dulcimer and banjo making, pottery, and glassblowing.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 4, Apr 1999, p14, il
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Record #:
4125
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Heritage tourism, or visiting an area for cultural enrichment, is one of the fastest growing segments of the state's second largest industry, tourism. This kind of tourism is also receiving national and international attention. Among the cities that showcase their heritage are Hillsborough, Salisbury, and Spencer.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 4, Apr 1999, p12-17, il
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Record #:
4139
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Incorporated in 1723, Beaufort, in Carteret County, is the state's third oldest city. It is also a mecca for tourists, with attractions that include historic homes, specialty shops, shipbuilding, the Old Burying Ground, and the N.C. Maritime Museum.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 12, May 1999, p80-83, 85, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4329
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In 1881, French artist Paul Phillipoteaux painted the Battle of Gettysburg Cyclorama. It is the world's largest oil painting, measuring 376 feet long and 22 feet high. Wake Forest University now owns the painting and stores it in Clemmons, North Carolina. State Senator Ham Horton of Winston-Salem feels the painting would be a great tourist attraction and got $50,000 from the 1999 General Assembly to do a feasibility study on assembling the painting in suitable surroundings as a tourist attraction.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 10, Oct 1999, p8, il, por
Record #:
4447
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Abstract:
Hurricanes Dennis and Floyd; a hot, dry summer; and a flood influenced tourists' decisions on whether or not to vacation in North Carolina. A number of tourists wrote off the entire state, even though only certain sections were affected. Tourism dropped slightly, despite a public relations campaign by the North Carolina Department of Tourism. On the positive side, big events like the Special Olympics World Games in Raleigh and the U.S. Open in Pinehurst were boons to tourism.
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Record #:
4625
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A joint activity of the North Carolina Division of Tourism, Film and Sports Development, and the Department of Cultural Resources, The Rich Heritage of African-Americans in North Carolina, highlights statewide historic sites and cultural events of interest to African-Americans.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 58 Issue 5, May 2000, p6, il
Record #:
5980
Abstract:
Tourism in North Carolina is a $12 billion industry, with shopping, beaches, and historical places among the most favored activities by tourists. Heritage tourism, or visiting an area for cultural enrichment, continues to be a significant niche market. Among the new developments in the heritage area are a Civil War trails program, modeled after the one in Virginia, and a trail system of agricultural/cultural tourism sites.
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Record #:
7828
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Heritage tourism, or visiting an area for cultural and natural enrichment, is one of the fastest growing segments of the state's second largest industry, tourism. Using the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area as an example, Wright discusses what is involved in securing a heritage designation. The Blue Ridge area covers twenty-five western North Carolina counties. Other heritage initiatives include ecotourism, such as the North Carolina Birding Trail, and a movement to save the rapidly disappearing heritage of the Southern mill towns, the Southwide Textile Heritage Initiative.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 5, May 2006, p16, 18-19, 22-23, il
Record #:
11980
Abstract:
Biltmore House, the home of George Vanderbilt near Asheville, opened to the public in 1930. When William Cecil, Vanderbilt's grandson, returned to claim his inheritance in 1960, he found the property beginning to show signs of age and losing money. Over the next two decades Cecil spent millions upgrading the property, which now attracts over 400,000 visitors a year.
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Record #:
11979
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Daniel T. Roth, Director of the North Carolina Travel & Tourism Division, discusses what the industry needs to handle the influx of vacationers coming to North Carolina every year. In 1979, the industry generated an estimated $2.2 billion in dollar turnover.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 38 Issue 7, July 1980, p42, 103-104, il
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Record #:
24368
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The tourism industry in North Carolina boomed in 1987, and the industry's impact is steadily increasing. Charlotte is just one community where hotels are providing jobs close to home and capitalizing on the tourism market.
Record #:
24454
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This article presents passenger routes in North Carolina, such as Tweetsie Railroad, that serve as tourist attractions and relics of North Carolina’s past.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 12, May 1991, p24-29, il
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