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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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29 results for "Taxation--North Carolina"
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Record #:
29301
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Abstract:
The 1991 North Carolina General Assembly met with great controversy after convening. This year marked the largest cuts in state spending along side the largest tax increase in state history. Spending cuts were delivered mainly to education budgets, while tax increases were made to the state sales tax and corporate income taxes.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1991, p21-23, il
Record #:
30058
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the height of World War II, the South Atlantic group of states led the nation in tax increase from the 1930s to 1942, and North Carolina led this group of states. The large increase in taxes in North Carolina is due to the tax collections on tobacco products.
Record #:
30096
Author(s):
Abstract:
A resolution has passed for the re-examination of the North Carolina Tax Structure and revision of the present system of taxation in order to promote the development of industry. The present tax burden for North Carolina is higher than normal economic capacity, and industries are asking for some relief.
Record #:
30118
Abstract:
The 1945 North Carolina General Assembly made major adjustments to tax laws particularly in regards to the taxation of insurance companies which included rewriting provisions to gross premiums. Changes also included credit given to those pursuing higher education, allowances for dependents in institutions, no sales tax on seed and stock food, and credit allowed for franchise taxes.
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Record #:
30389
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Abstract:
For decades, North Carolina politicians, policy analysts, and interest groups have talked about reforming the state’s antiquated tax code. This article presents different perspectives in the Great Tax Reform Debate of 2013, and discusses challenges in the state economy. Also discussed are recommendations for a form of consumption taxation called the USA Tax, for Unlimited Savings Allowance.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 92 Issue 1, Spring 2013, p23-24, por
Record #:
30474
Abstract:
The interplay between interest deductions and the calculation of net operating losses presents a particular problem in some states. North Carolina banks operating in Maryland may not be getting the full benefit of the deduction for interest on federal obligations to which they are entitled. This article provides an example of how a state’s interpretation of its tax laws can adversely affect a North Carolina bank.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 93 Issue 3, Fall 2014, p18-19, por
Record #:
30515
Author(s):
Abstract:
Industry in North Carolina pays slightly higher taxes at the state level than most of states in the country. Industry pays income tax, franchise tax, gasoline and license tax of motor vehicle equipment, and sales tax. These higher taxes are due to the the State's coverage of 90% of the cost of public education and the cost of road construction and maintenance.
Record #:
30736
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New state taxes, such as a sales and use tax on digital property, begin this year in North Carolina. This article discusses the state’s current tax system, taxing authorities, and tax credits relevant to electricity.
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Record #:
30761
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With the completion of the 1957 North Carolina state legislature session, there is no indication of changes to the upward trend of state budgets and taxes. Both expenditures and revenues will exceed $22 billion in the 1958 as compared to $9 billion ten years ago.
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Record #:
30777
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Abstract:
Although there has been some fall off in tax collections as compared to estimates, a recent study by the Wall Street Journal shows that North Carolina is in no worse condition that many others states. A growing number of states that levy consumption taxes as a source of state operating revenue are falling into the red as spending outweighs recession-eroded revenues.
Record #:
31029
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1961 North Carolina General Assembly made major changes to the sales and use tax laws. Many transactions that are now exempt from retail sales and/or use taxes are now taxable at a rate of 3 percent or 1 percent such as the sale of fuels to farmers, horses or mules, fuels to commercial laundries, and farm machines.
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Record #:
31040
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Abstract:
Changes in the Revenue Act increased the North Carolina General Fund over $32 million. Levied surtax was issued on liquors; sales and use tax exemptions were removed on horses and mules, fuel, and freezer supplies; sales and use tax exemptions were removed on farm and mill machinery, office equipment, and broadcasting equipment; tax rates were increased on sales and use tax on motor vehicles and airplanes; and sales and use tax exemptions were removed on sales of drugs, food, newspapers, photographs, and sales to State of North Carolina and its agencies.
Record #:
31376
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the first time, North Carolina state sales tax will be applied to the sales of electric, gas and intrastate telephone service. Beginning January 1, 1985, electric bills will include a calculation for three percent in state sales tax, which can be deducted from federal income taxes. The legislature’s intent was to carve the sales tax out of the six percent gross receipts tax that consumers were already paying.
Record #:
32317
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Scott proposed in the legislative budget to increase the gross premium tax on insurance companies doing business in North Carolina. The state’s life insurance industry believes this is an undue tax burden, which would further result in driving off investment capital from the state, placing the domestic life insurance industry at a further disadvantage in competing with out-of-state firms.
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