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29 results for "Taxation--North Carolina"
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Record #:
30389
Author(s):
Abstract:
For decades, North Carolina politicians, policy analysts, and interest groups have talked about reforming the state’s antiquated tax code. This article presents different perspectives in the Great Tax Reform Debate of 2013, and discusses challenges in the state economy. Also discussed are recommendations for a form of consumption taxation called the USA Tax, for Unlimited Savings Allowance.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 92 Issue 1, Spring 2013, p23-24, por
Record #:
28457
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s laws enable banks to dodge millions in taxes. The Durham-based Institute for Southern Studies and Asheville-based Investigative Reporting Fund have suggested that the state’s bank tax laws need reformed. Campaign contributions, lobbyists, grassroots organizing, influential board members, and a system of rewards and punishments for incumbent legislators have allowed the banks to create a tax system that favors them. A look at the current system and how it could be changed is explored.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 51, December 1994, p9 Periodical Website
Record #:
17912
Abstract:
Cheshire discusses an explanation of bankruptcy and taxation in North Carolina.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 23 Issue 5, Feb 1957, p12-13
Record #:
17547
Author(s):
Abstract:
A statistical breakdown of each of the 53 county taxes, whether these decreased or increased, and which tax funds benefited different programs for the fiscal year of 1959-1960.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 26 Issue 2, Oct 1959, p1-6, il
Record #:
2092
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor James Hunt's tax-cutting proposals to the N.C. General Assembly include a repeal of the intangibles tax, lower corporate income taxes, and sizeable cuts on personal income taxes.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 1, Jan 1995, p31, il
Record #:
30118
Abstract:
The 1945 North Carolina General Assembly made major adjustments to tax laws particularly in regards to the taxation of insurance companies which included rewriting provisions to gross premiums. Changes also included credit given to those pursuing higher education, allowances for dependents in institutions, no sales tax on seed and stock food, and credit allowed for franchise taxes.
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Record #:
31376
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the first time, North Carolina state sales tax will be applied to the sales of electric, gas and intrastate telephone service. Beginning January 1, 1985, electric bills will include a calculation for three percent in state sales tax, which can be deducted from federal income taxes. The legislature’s intent was to carve the sales tax out of the six percent gross receipts tax that consumers were already paying.
Record #:
31029
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1961 North Carolina General Assembly made major changes to the sales and use tax laws. Many transactions that are now exempt from retail sales and/or use taxes are now taxable at a rate of 3 percent or 1 percent such as the sale of fuels to farmers, horses or mules, fuels to commercial laundries, and farm machines.
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Record #:
18639
Author(s):
Abstract:
Personal income tax accounted for 38 percent of the state's tax revenue in the early 1980s. Local level programs relied heavily on income tax for funding, so much so that the state was in the top seven nationwide. The author presents statewide personal income tax statistics with national averages to show how much revenue is generated, where it comes from, and how these numbers rank with other states.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 48 Issue 2, Fall 1982, p24-29
Record #:
13466
Author(s):
Abstract:
Forsyth ranks as the highest tax earning county while offering the lowest tax rates. Pamlico charges the highest tax rates, followed by Mecklenburg, and Guilford Counties. Further information and tax rates are included and offer details regarding Durham, Wake, Catawba, Polk, Ashe, Hyde, and Greene Counties.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 5, July 1952, p3, 19, il
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Record #:
17496
Author(s):
Abstract:
The present state constitution of North Carolina, written in 1868, contains similar provisions to the Federal constitution so that state taxes in North Carolina may only be levied by members of the House of Representatives and the Senate. In a time of change and innovation, North Carolina's tax structure is also changing.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 16 Issue 9, June 1950, p8-11
Record #:
18643
Author(s):
Abstract:
Upcoming changes to taxes are expected with the newly elected Republican majority. Republican leaders propose eliminate personal income tax and increasing sales taxes. The author analyzes how these changes may be implemented and subsequent impact on the state's citizens.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 3, Jan 2013, p19 Periodical Website
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Record #:
29301
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1991 North Carolina General Assembly met with great controversy after convening. This year marked the largest cuts in state spending along side the largest tax increase in state history. Spending cuts were delivered mainly to education budgets, while tax increases were made to the state sales tax and corporate income taxes.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1991, p21-23, il
Record #:
31040
Author(s):
Abstract:
Changes in the Revenue Act increased the North Carolina General Fund over $32 million. Levied surtax was issued on liquors; sales and use tax exemptions were removed on horses and mules, fuel, and freezer supplies; sales and use tax exemptions were removed on farm and mill machinery, office equipment, and broadcasting equipment; tax rates were increased on sales and use tax on motor vehicles and airplanes; and sales and use tax exemptions were removed on sales of drugs, food, newspapers, photographs, and sales to State of North Carolina and its agencies.
Record #:
23064
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Interstate highway system in North Carolina faces daily issues of clogging, high traffic volume, and accidents. Unfortunately, over the next 35 years, the state of North Carolina will need to spend $11.3 billion in reconstruction and $9.4 billion to widen the roads. John Hood, president of the John William Pope Foundation suggests that rather than raising the sales tax, the state should consider using tolls to pay for interstate improvements.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 1, January 2015, p6-7, il Periodical Website