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13 results for "Sandburg, Carl, 1878-1967"
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Record #:
9956
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ball State University Professor of English William A. Sutton visited poet Carl Sandburg at Connemara Farm, Sandburg's Flat Rock, NC home, on March 25, 1967. Sutton recorded his observations of and his conversations with Sandburg and his family, including Sandburg's wife and two of his three daughters. The house at Connemara Farm was originally built by Christopher Gustavus Memminger, Secretary of the Confederate Treasury, and is now a National Historic Site.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 19, May 1973, p9-11, il, por
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Record #:
7750
Author(s):
Abstract:
Just south of Hendersonville, North Carolina, is the former residence of Pulitzer Prize winner Carl Sandburg. The house sits on a 240-acre farm on the side of a mountain in the Blue Ridge foothills. Built in 1838, the house has a high porch and is constructed of white clapboard. Sandburg's wife, Paula, raised goats as a hobby. The farm is the only National Historic Site of its kind. Visitors can take twenty-minute tours of the house with the accompaniment of the National Park Service guide. Here, they can see how the famous writer created such master pieces as the biography of Abraham Lincoln and his “Complete Poems” on a typewriter which sat on an orange crate.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p12-13, il
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Record #:
35770
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Abstract:
The Mountains were a valuable part of NC, the author proclaimed, initially measuring this value in the types of precious stones to be found in ranges such as Pisgah. Discussed later was their greatest source of wealth—the people. Such people included those there before the arrival of English settlers, such as the Cherokee. Such people included the generations of immigrants and present day resident of Appalachia. The author concluded that collectively they helped to make the area what it became.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p27-28,45
Record #:
23434
Author(s):
Abstract:
Famous for his writings on the life of the workingman, Carl Sandberg was a poet, biographer, and newspaper columnist. He was born in Galesville, IL, went to school until he reached the eighth grade. He fought in the Spanish-American War and then attended Lombard College. He moved from job to job in his youth until joining the Wisconsin Social Democratic Party. His biography of Abraham Lincoln and his book, Complete Poems, won Pulitzer prizes. On April 24, 1939, Carl Sandberg gave a program to a packed audience at Wright Auditorium on the campus of East Carolina Teachers College. He died on July 22, 1967.
Record #:
36552
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carl Sandburg is perhaps widely known in the United States as a poet and lesser known as a writer of children’s stories. Perhaps better known by North Carolinians about Sandburg is Connamara, Greek Revival summer house in Flat Rock where he lived with his wife, who was just as well known in the community for her raising goats. This dwelling, built in 1839, is a National Historic site.
Record #:
35773
Abstract:
The author asserted the home, with grounds declared a historic site by the Federal Government, belied significance on many levels. Personal significance was illustrated in the builder naming the house after a town in Ireland. Personal significance can be perceived in the appreciated beauty of Western North Carolina that encouraged the Sandburgs’ move from Michigan. As for its historical significance, that can be gauged in its construction during the antebellum period and the original owner’s position as treasurer for the Confederacy.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p54
Record #:
13196
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two notable things about Henderson County are the new General Electric Company Plant and that it is the home of Carl Sandburg. He is a world famous writer, an accomplished folklorist, and a widely praised poet. Currently, he is working on a biography of Abraham Lincoln.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 24, Apr 1956, p12-13, f
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Record #:
35809
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Abstract:
Noted first were reasons to appreciate the Coast and its waters, particularly sites that lend appeal. Land marks ranged from the well-known Outer Banks to perhaps lesser known Bird’s Island. Towns included famed Kittyhawk to the famed by relatively few Duck. As for what he saw as evidence of being taken for granted: pollution of air and water, destruction to dunes and wildlife. Out of an enduring appreciation for, and mounting concern about, he called for all North Carolinians to restore the Coast and its waters for future generations and out of a sacred duty.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p40-42, 56-60
Record #:
16204
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1945, the Sandburg family packed up their belongings and goats in Michigan and moved to a 245-acre farm, called Connemara, in Flat Rock. There he would produce some of his best work over the next twenty-two years. Dickey describes the farm and the Sandburg's life there.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 10, Mar 2012, p118-120, 122, 124, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
2277
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carl Sandburg, poet and Lincoln biographer, bought Connemara, his home in Flat Rock, in 1945, and lived there with his family the last twenty- two years of his life. The three-story, twenty-two-room house is a National Historic Site.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 12, May 1995, p36-39, il
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Record #:
4175
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carl Sandburg, one of the country's greatest poets and authors, purchased a house with 240 acres in Flat Rock in 1945. What surprises many people is the reason he and his family moved from Michigan. His wife, Lilian, had a business raising Chikaming goats. She was seeking a more temperate climate for her herd, considered one of the nation's finest. Sandburg wrote his only novel, Remembrance Rock, there. After his death in 1967, his home became a National Historic Site.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 3, Aug 1990, p30-32, il
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Record #:
23874
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Abstract:
At an annual ceremony at the Carl Sandburg Home in Flat Rock, North Carolina, immigrants from around the world officially become U.S. citizens.
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Record #:
35733
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many places to go in NC, proven by the author. Evidence seen in historic towns such as Edenton and Halifax. Examples of historic houses were the House in a Horseshoe and Duke Homestead. Noted historic sites included Connemara and Guildford Courthouse National Military Park. As for outdoor sites of significance, they included Hammocks Beach and Nantahala National Forest.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p75-76, 79