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31 results for "Race relations"
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Record #:
34660
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In 1931, Paul Green was asked to change the ending of his play by the directors. The old ending involved the murder of one white former sharecropper by two black sharecroppers after she married the wealthy landowner, while the new ending would spare her life to create a positive image of rising above the class she was born into. This change was originally thought to have been made to cater to the ideology that one can rise about their rank to attain fortune. However, Vines argues that the original ending depicted the real tensions between the white and black populations of the South after reconstruction, and the new ending ignores these issues.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016, p72-85, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
28186
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The Anathoth Community Garden is a symbol of peace-building among the diverse populations who live in Cedar Grove, NC. Founded after respected community member Bill King was murdered, the garden works to address the economic injustices that lay behind racial tensions. The garden serves many of the communities poorest residents through the donation of its produce and encourages community building among its members.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 50, December 2008, p29-31 Periodical Website
Record #:
1094
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Buckner surveys written works that deal with slavery and race relations, with a focus on works of NC writers, both black and white, who confronted these issues in their writings.
Record #:
28821
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After two young African-American men were shot and killed by Raleigh cops, city officials say it’s necessary to understand different truths. Meetings are being held through Raleigh's Community Conversations Series, which is designed to facilitate a dialogue between residents, police officers, and elected officials about race and police relations.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 45, Nov 2016, p8, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17073
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Cader Harris of Elizabeth city has been awarded the Nancy Susan Reynolds Award. Harris, 84, received the award, which is given to \"unsung heroes\" annually, for his work in promoting good race relations in his community.
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Record #:
34602
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Cameron recalls visiting her grandfather at Buchoi, his rice plantation on the Cape Fear River, at Christmas during her childhood. Central to her recollections are yearly traditions including decorating the house, retrieving the yule log for the celebration, and baking desserts. As much of the preparatory work was conducted by black slaves, Cameron devotes much of the work to detailing interactions between the family and their slaves.
Record #:
27503
Abstract:
Duke historians John Hope Franklin and Lawrence Goodwyn talk about the impact and results of the Harvey Gantt vs. Jesse Helms senate race. Many white voters crossed the “racial rubicon” voting for the first time in the close election between a black man and a white man. Helms ultimately defeated Gantt, by Franklin and Goodwyn see the voting results as hope for the future where issues are important and race is not a factor. They applaud Gantt for helping North Carolina move forward in its thinking.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 46, November 14-20 1990, p8-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
39992
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This was a transcript of an interview with Malinda Lowery, in which she discussed her book, The Lumbee Indians: An American Struggle. Her responses focused on Lumbee history lessons that can offer better solutions for particular social and environmental issues. George Lowry’s pursuit of recompense for his sons’ murders can inspire those experiencing racial injustice. A perspective stressing deeper kinship with the natural world can model effective ways to cope with natural disasters like hurricanes.
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Record #:
25422
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After 150 students showed up at ECU President Leo Jenkins’ front door, new changes were made to better incorporate the African American student body and make their life at ECU more comfortable.
Record #:
28244
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Prominent historian Dr. John Hope Franklin of Duke speaks out on the real work of ending discrimination. Franklin believes that apologizing for slavery and injustices done to African-Americans is not enough. Franklin also discusses the politics of slavery and the post-Reconstruction era. Topics covered in the interview include the Wilmington race riots, race relations, the taking down of statues of racist individuals, and his family's history.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 16, April 2007, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
2000
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High Point's Robert J. Brown directs his company, B & C Associates, in advising some of the country's largest companies on race relations. Brown is a former principal adviser to President Nixon on minority issues.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Nov 1994, p8-11, il
Record #:
28452
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Abstract:
Mab Segrest is one of North Carolina’s best-known organizers against racist and homophobic violence. An excerpt of Segrest’s new work, Memoir of a Race Traitor, is published here. The memoir tells of her work with North Carolinians Against Racist and Religious Violence, organizing against the Klan and Nazi movements in places like Statesville, Shelby, and Robeson County. Segrest’s personal story is also told and how she became a “race traitor.”
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 17, April-May 1994, p21-25 Periodical Website
Record #:
25660
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UNC doctoral student Darin Waters is writing the history of the Young Men’s Institute Cultural Center at the Biltmore Estate, which has offered educational programs and other services for African Americans in Asheville since 1893. Waters discovered the Biltmore Estate did not did not force African Americans to leave; rather, Biltmore was part of a mutual agreement that relied on the help of black craftsman and philanthropy.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 1, Fall 2009, p24-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21753
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This article examines the efforts in Wilson County between 1941 and 1953 by educational activists who fought for equal educational opportunities for African-American students. The article discusses the poor conditions forced upon students and the role of the NAACP and activist Mark Sharpe has in improving those conditions.
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Record #:
149
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NC STAR is a program designed to urge elementary and high school students to act as agents for social change, especially in the arena of race relations.
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Voice (NoCar LB 2831.624 N8 V6x), Vol. 5 Issue 6, Winter 1992, p25-26