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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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12 results for "Oyster industry"
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Record #:
32203
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North Carolina’s oyster farming industry is expanding and gaining an excellent reputation among seafood consumers. Scientists from the University of North Carolina Wilmington and Carteret Community College have partnered with commercial oyster farms to identify native strains of oysters best suited for farming and aquaculture.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2018, p6-11, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28790
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The partnership between oyster fishermen and scientists is a unique one. The Sandbar Oyster Company and the Institute of Marine Sciences of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill work together with local knowledge with scientific knowledge and data to harvest and study North Carolina’s oysters. Their partnership is good for business, education, and research.
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Record #:
28791
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The boring sponge is narrowing the regions that are open to shellfish harvests free of the infestation. The boring sponge has a major effect on oyster populations and pose an economic problem to oyster farmers. The author discusses a study he created to test how oysters were affected by the substrate on which the oysters grow. The results of the study and the problem are detailed.
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Record #:
7326
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The skipjack ADA MAE was built by Captain Ralph Hodges in Rose Bay, Hyde County, in 1915. Skipjacks, or two-sail bateaus, were dredge boats that supported the state's oyster industry. The ADA MAE is believed to be the only remaining skipjack built in North Carolina. It was found in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1994, by an East Carolina University graduate student who was working on a research project in Maryland. The ADA MAE is moored at Washington, North Carolina, where restoration work is being completed. It will be used there as a classroom to teach students about the oyster industry in the state.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p118-122, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25068
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Seafood companies are looking for new ways to sell seafood. Their best idea is to come up with pre-prepackaged value-added foods that can become a quick lunch or dinner option.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2004, p26-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
31103
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This article reviews the rich history of oystering in North Carolina, details its contemporary problems, and reports on projects that are helping to restore the fishery. The North Carolina Coastal Federation is working to improve habitat and water quality.
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Record #:
4451
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The state's oyster industry has declined since the start of the 20th-century, dropping from an annual harvest of two million bushels to 44,613 bushels in 1998. Over-harvesting, harvesting methods, and a natural occurring parasite are contributors to the decline. Recommendations to alleviate the oyster crisis include aquaculture, improving the quality of coastal waters, and developing disease resistant strains.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2000, p6-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
26374
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The North Carolina oyster industry began its ascent in the 1880s, bringing together local laborers and Chesapeake oystermen to develop a thriving economy. With this prosperity, however, came controversy and overharvesting. Now oysters have practically vanished from North Carolina.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 48 Issue 3, Fall 2000, p8-9, il
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Record #:
3089
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In the 1890s, the state harvested over 2.5 million bushels of oysters yearly. However, a combination of ecological, economic, and management factors reduced the harvest to 42,000 bushels barely a hundred years later.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1996, p22-24, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
1869
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North Carolina's oyster production has declined at an alarming rate since the turn of the century. N.C. Sea Grant, the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries, and other interested parties convened a summit to address the state's feeble oyster industry.
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Record #:
31674
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Rose Bay Oyster House is one of about twenty shucking houses in North Carolina, and the only one in the state that has its own oyster beds. Henderson Miles, a manager of the Rose Bay company, discusses oyster harvesting and some of the problems facing the oyster industry. According to Jim Brown of the Division of Commercial and Sports Fisheries, some of the problems are pollution and the lack of substrate for oysters to live.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 8, Aug 1974, p20-21, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
11749
Abstract:
Montgomery discusses North Carolina's oyster industry, which has a yearly value of $100,000.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 11, Aug 1934, p18, 22, il
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