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79 results for "Outer Banks--History"
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Record #:
36167
Abstract:
The connection between a well known area of the Outer Banks and Beaufort County's capital was created physically. For many decades, ferries like the Bessie Virginia transported good between “Little Washington” and area known for its connection to Roanoke’s lost colony. It was also created emotionally, in the bonds between people interdependent on each other for survival.
Record #:
24815
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Rachel Carson came to the North Carolina coast in 1947 and documented much of the coastal area she explored. Much of what she described can still be found and explored today from Bird Shoal to Taylor’s Creek.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2016, p6-13, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
23119
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Judge Charles Harry Whedbee, a Greenville native, was drawn to the Outer Banks throughout his life. Spending every summer at Nags Head, he heard stories, myths, and legends, all of which he later recorded through his own oral storytelling and writing.
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Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Spring 2015, p46-47, por
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Record #:
19416
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For the first seven months of World War II, German U-Boats ruled the Eastern seaboard of the United States. Waters off North Carolina's Outer Banks were a favorite hunting ground as night after night explosions at sea signaled the sinking of another Allied ship. By the time the Germans withdrew their U-Boats in July, over 400 ships were sunk or damaged from New England to New Orleans and 5,000 sailors were killed. Over sixty ships went down off the Outer Banks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 11, Apr 2013, p50-52, 54, 56-58, 60, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
19531
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Captain Ernie Foster's father, Captain Ernal Foster, started the first charter boat business on North Carolina's Outer Banks in 1937. Locals laughed at him at first and wondered how such an undertaking could be successful; yet, over the years his business grew and prospered. Captain Ernie is probably the last captain in the original family. Sports fishing, however, is a big competitor of commercial fishing, and Captain Ernie works to keep his family fleet that fishes for fun.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p130-134, 136-138, 140, 142-144, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8940
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At age 102, Wayland Baum is thought to be the oldest living former employee of the U.S. Lighthouse Service. His father, Thomas Hardy Baum, was an assistant lighthouse keeper at stations on the Outer Banks. Wayland was born August 16, 1904. Baum recounts his days as a substitute lighthouse keeper and time spent on a boat that delivered supplies to the lighthouses. He later had a career in commercial and charter boat fishing and guiding waterfowl hunters. Baum retired at 85 and maintains his own home, washing the windows and painting the house when it needs it.
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Record #:
9480
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In 1949, before he became a world-famous poet, A. R. Ammons held his first teaching job at Hatteras Elementary School in Hatteras Village on the Outer Banks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p204-206, 208, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9510
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The Chicamacomico Life-Saving Station Historic Site at Rodanthe on Hatteras Island is the most complete of the few remaining stations on the East Coast. These stations were the predecessors of the Coast Guard Service, and the stories of the daring rescues they performed are legendary. Chicamacomico closed in 1954 after seventy years of service. Today, the Chicamacomico Historical Association keeps the memory of the station and the men who served there alive through living history performances.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 11, Nov 2007, p50-51, il
Record #:
7477
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In this excerpt from his book, Hatteras Blues: A Story from the Edge of America, Tom Carlson describes how Ernal Foster's ideas about blue-water sportfishing caught on and created an industry on the Outer Banks.
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Record #:
34705
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The first recorded visit of European explorers to the Outer Banks occurred in 1524. An Italian adventurer, Giovanni da Verazzano was sponsored by the King of France to explore the New World. Landing north of Kure Beach, Verazzano proceeded past Shackleford Banks recording the local flora and fauna. While anchored for the night, the crew met some of the local Tuscarora and Coree peoples. The crew noted that Europeans were greeted with enthusiasm and welcomed, a sentiment which would fade by the early 18th century. The vessel continued to patrol the coast and later met Algonquian Indians living in the northern Outer Banks. Verazzano would continue north up the coast, eventually arriving at New York Harbor and Nantucket Island.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 20 Issue 2, Winter 2004, p3-15, il, map
Record #:
5740
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On March 7, 1962, a powerful nor'easter of huge proportions struck the Outer Banks on Ash Wednesday. Shelton-Roberts describes the fury of the storm, its origins, and aftermath.
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Record #:
5749
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Parramore discusses the Wright Brothers' work leading up to the historic flight on December 17, 1903, and the contributions in work and support of the Outer Bankers and men of the life-saving station.
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Record #:
5395
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On December 21, 1884, lookouts at Outer Banks life-saving stations spotted the barkentine EPHRAIM WILLIAMS in distress. Duffus describes the daring rescue of the ship's crew, carried out by Outer Banks lifesavers in huge rolling waves, frigid water, and fierce winds.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 7, Dec 2002, p25-26, 28-29, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
34668
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The town of Marshallberg is today located on a land grant dating to 1713. The property’s first owner, George Bell, deeded the estate to his heirs who would construct the town’s first industry, a windmill, on site in 1819. When a request was made for a local post office, the community adopted the name Marshallberg in honor of the local mail boat operator, Matt Marshall. The community continued to grow, and by the early 1900s, was engaged with seafood packing and processing. In 1910, a shipbuilding practice was established which would operate through the 1990s. The community underwent many changes during the 20th century although it still retains a post office and active fishing community.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Spring 2002, p3-5, il
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Record #:
4961
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For those on the Outer Banks and Carteret County, conflict with the British Navy was continual between 1776 and 1782. Yocum describes the six-year struggle and the patriots who defended coastal Carolina.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 10, Mar 2001, p55-57, 59-61, il Periodical Website
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