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41 results for "North Carolina--History--1775-1865"
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Record #:
19656
Abstract:
This article examines the general social attitudes and habits of North Carolina during the antebellum period through the analysis of laws passed, Supreme Court decisions, local newspaper articles and perspectives on North Carolina from neighboring states. The author finds that the most common social characteristics for the period were individualism, conservatism, sectionalism, provincialism, and superstition, and each trait is addressed in its own section.
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19674
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Benjamin Hawkins was born in Warren County on August 15, 1754 served as George Washington's interpreter during the Revolutionary War before returning to his native state. From 1787-1795 he served as a state legislator before being appointed to Superintendent to all Native American tribes south of the Ohio River. In this role, he was influential in establishing favorable trading practice between American and Native American tribes throughout the south.
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19740
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This article looks at the limited means for communication in North Carolina during the revolutionary period. The piece focuses on challenges to timely communication centered on the slow development of a proper postal system in the state, including an examination of messenger services, poor facilities and roads, and prohibitive costs as well as the consequences of unreliable communication methods.
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19776
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This article looks at the popularity of the religious revival movement in antebellum North Carolina also known as the Great Revival. The article is divided into sections looking at antecedents of the Great Revival, the coming of the Great Revival, the great Revival among the Methodists, the Baptists and the Great Revival, religious cycles, and the psychology of the revival.
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Record #:
20092
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This article looks at the shared history of North Carolina and Mississippi. Some attention is given to overland travel routes between the two states used after 1783, the settlement of the Mississippi territory, the influence of extant North Carolina on developing Gulf cotton states, and some biographical information on prominent Mississippians who came from North Carolina.
Source:
Administration of Justice Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7908 .A15 U6), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Jan 1945, p43-57, f
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20119
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In a 1913 publication, Dr. Charles Beard proposed that the ratification of the United States constitution marked a class division in support of this document with wealthy property owners at the forefront of creating and approving the document while poorer citizens and the working-class were not represented fairly in constitutional debates. To analyze this thesis, the author of this piece compares Beard's findings against the historic data from North Carolina's Hillsboro Convention to look at the economic interests of the state's Federalists.
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20126
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The final installment of this piece, the first part appeared in the January issue of this volume and the second in July, covering the economic and social disparities between Federalists and Anti-Federalists participating not in the Hillsboro Convention as covered in the first two articles but the Fayetteville Convention of 1789. The author compares the two opposing sides in attendance but also the Fayetteville attendees against the Hillsboro delegation.
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20122
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The second half of an article appearing in issue one of this volume continues the demographic and economic analysis of participants at the Hillsboro Convention to ratify the Federal Constitution. Specific interests and desires of the Federalists were covered in the first article and for the second part of the analysis, the author examines the Anti-Federalist present at the convention.
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Record #:
20381
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North Carolina militia men proved themselves to be tough soldiers during the War for American Independence, and success in the Carolinas rested on them under the command of General Nathanael Greene.
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20717
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This essay attempts to provide an overview of life in the 1850s. A significant amount of attention is given to national and international politics of the day and its effect on the country as a whole.
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20826
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Elkanah Watson was a notable noted 19th century author who spent two years in eastern North Carolina as a planter-merchant. During this period, the state was grappling over the issue of ratifying the newly written constitution. The author examines primary documentation from Watson's manuscript collection to argue that the author played a significant role in supporting state Federalists and the eventual ratification of the constitution by state representatives.
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Record #:
21044
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In 1781, North Carolina was a year into an extensive civil war, lacking resources and unified government. On June 25th Dr. Thomas Burke was elected as the state's third governor after having served for four years as one of North Carolina's delegates to the Continental Congress. Unable to contend with the problems of civil war within the state, he resigned after only 10 months of service.
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Record #:
21271
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This article examines the building process as it relates to architecture of the antebellum period with a focus on the manner in which buildings were designed, material manufactured, and labor organized to reveal something of the economic and social conditions of the period.
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Record #:
24641
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The Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry was organized in 1793 and has been celebrated every year since. It is the oldest military infantry in the South and the second oldest to be organized in the country.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 20, March 1959, p9, 15, por
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Record #:
24952
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Part four of a twelve part series describes the growth of Charlotte in the twenty years leading up to the Civil War. The building of a railroad connection to Charleston, South Carolina helped to stabilize the local economy after the gold rush ended in 1840. Fear of abolitionists and slaves escaping encouraged tensions before the war.