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12 results for "Municipal water supply"
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Record #:
34362
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has an average annual rainfall of forty inches, but in recent years, widespread drought has raised concern over the abundance of water supplies. This article examines the current state of water supply and water use in North Carolina.
Record #:
34360
Author(s):
Abstract:
Water providers and customers in North Carolina learned invaluable lessons from the record drought that reached its peak in the summer of 2002. Mandatory conservation measures were widespread and many people became good at rationing water. In spite of conservation efforts, municipal water providers in Orange County and other communities have increased their rates.
Record #:
34220
Author(s):
Abstract:
Officials of local governments in Wake, Durham, Orange, Person and Granville counties are considering a study to determine measures needed to protect Falls of the Neuse Reservoir, the sole water supply for the City of Raleigh and several smaller municipalities. Commissioners emphasize the need for some objective basis for adopting a watershed protection ordinance for Falls Lake.
Record #:
874
Author(s):
Abstract:
Municipalities are experiencing difficulty enforcing storm-water requirements under the Clean Water Act.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 58 Issue 1, Summer 1992, p29-33, bibl, f
Record #:
34194
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a project sponsored by the North Carolina Urban Water Consortium, university investigators have concluded that the urban water utilities they studied may need to improve removal of disinfection by-products from drinking water to meet requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1986. They also conclude that requirements for removal of synthetic organic chemicals and volatile organic chemicals will probably not have a major impact on the utilities.
Record #:
34196
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission voted to postpone until December a vote on granting the power of eminent domain to the Piedmont Triad Regional Water Authority for acquiring land to construct a regional water supply dam. The Randleman Lake project is to be built in Randolph and Guilford counties to supply the municipalities of Randleman, High Point, Jamestown, Archdale, and Greensboro and Randolph County.
Record #:
34084
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chapel Hill, Hillsborough, Durham, Apex, Cary and other municipalities in the Research Triangle either have been or soon will be facing shortfalls in their water supplies. This article discusses the current supply and demand for water, and the need for a more comprehensive approach to water management.
Record #:
33462
Abstract:
This article is a summary of presentations made at the September 16 Leaders Conference on Groundwater. Representatives discussed municipal concerns, local government concerns, and industry concerns about groundwater in North Carolina.
Record #:
33465
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill made recommendations for biologically controlling phosphorus releases from the wastewater treatment plant operated by the Orange Water and Sewer Authority (OWASA). The Division of Environmental Management will soon issue regulations limiting phosphorus concentrations in discharges from municipal wastewater treatment facilities into streams feeding nutrient sensitive water bodies.
Record #:
33463
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is formulating a strategy for assisting municipalities in financing construction of water and sewer facilities. According to Mary Joan Pugh, assistant secretary for the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development, the state will propose the establishment of a revolving loan fund for local governments to construct new wastewater treatment facilities.
Record #:
33492
Author(s):
Abstract:
Urban planning experts at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill report that population and economic growth have left many cities and towns in the Southeast with inadequate water supply and sewer systems. They attribute this condition more to a lack of planning and realistic pricing than a lack of ability to pay for the necessary facilities. Municipalities are trying to cope with growth pressures through conservation and postponed expansion, and by shifting financial burden to the private sector.
Record #:
265
Author(s):
Abstract:
Municipal officials need state financial assistance to handle water supply and water quality concerns.
Source:
North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p66-74, il, bibl, f Periodical Website
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