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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for "Mental health services--North Carolina"
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Record #:
23794
Abstract:
Lisbeth and Don Cooper founded CooperRiis in Polk County, a holistic community-based approach to treatment, as an alternative to the mainstream mental health system.
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Record #:
25553
Author(s):
Abstract:
Randi Davenport is an adjunct assistant professor in UNC’s Department of English and Comparative Literature. Davenport moved to Chapel Hill to find services and treatment for her son diagnosed with True Childhood Schizophrenia, but has received little help due to the complicated nature of the disorder. Davenport is now working with state officials to draft policy changes that will help people with mental illnesses.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p14-19, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28945
Abstract:
Two-thirds of North Carolina’s funding for mental health, mental retardation, and substance abuse service goes to maintain state institutions. Reform schools and special schools for blind and deaf children also attract high funding. Meanwhile, community-based programs receive far less money than the institutional programs, despite the state’s commitment to de-institutionalization.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p38-54, il, por, f
Record #:
27661
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Abstract:
After a relative’s negative post-hospital care experience for mental health problems, Bill and Betsy Blue formed the HopeWay Foundation in 2014. HopeWay, located in Charlotte, provides services for clients who have experienced a hospital stay but still need more attention.
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Record #:
28048
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina was once a leader in mental health, but after years of reforms the state no longer is. Because of this, the historic Dorothea Dix Hospital in Raleigh has stopped accepting patients. Established in 1848, the hospital served up to as many as 3,000 patients at a time with two or three times as many workers. Mental health funding in the state has received major cuts over the years and it is cheaper to send patients to other facilities.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 49, December 2010, p5, 8 Periodical Website