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24 results for "Land use--Planning"
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Record #:
25952
Author(s):
Abstract:
Local participation in land use planning is being considered the best way to overcome the pitfalls of rapid development. In response, the 1973 North Carolina General Assembly passed the Land Policy Act which created a land policy council to promote patterns of sound environmental land use that also encourage and support local governments exercise their responsibilities.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Spring 1974, p8
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Record #:
31170
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examines the fiscal implications, such as tax base, land use and public investment, of both high and low-density development patterns. Simmons suggests promoting private investments will drive private investors.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 37 Issue , 2012, p, il
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Record #:
31554
Abstract:
The Qualla Housing Authority is planning to carve and build new brick dwellings for the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians directly within the mountains of Western North Carolina, but various soil conservation problems are associated with such a project. The Soil Conservation Service recommended to use a high-pressure hydroseeder to plant grass, prevent erosion and maintain a foundation.
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Record #:
31711
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article discusses land use in North Carolina, and the challenges of balancing economic development with environmental preservation. Three bills which are currently pending in the legislature in Raleigh include the State Land Use and Classification Bill, Mountain Area Management Bill, and Coastal Area Management Bill.
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Record #:
31710
Abstract:
Many communities in North Carolina are experiencing rapid change as the population and urban development grows. John Shore, director of the North Carolina Land Use Congress, discusses land use base studies, the role of local government, taxation, public investment, and land use regulations.
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Record #:
31731
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has been accurately described as a fortune state, with good soil, adequate water a favorable climate, and quantities of open land. With multiple land users seeking to access this land, the Soil Conservation Service provides professional help on planning the best use for a tract of land. This article discusses the agency and their services to land use, protection, development and a variety of other needs.
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Record #:
32054
Author(s):
Abstract:
Families can lose substantial amounts of money and suffer many inconveniences because they are selecting poor homesites. In this article, soil scientists from North Carolina State University discuss the diversity of soil types found in the state and characteristics of suitable sites for land development.
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Record #:
34313
Author(s):
Abstract:
The State of North Carolina and the Federal Emergency Management Agency signed an agreement in mid-September to update flood maps in North Carolina. The flood maps need to be updated to reflect changes in a watershed and development which can affect flood stage or height of rising river water resulting from storms. Updating flood maps is an important first step in establishing guidelines and restrictions on land use in the floodplain.
Record #:
34334
Author(s):
Abstract:
Following a three-year effort to improve coastal land-use planning, the North Carolina Coastal Resources Commission adopted changes to Coastal Area Management Act (CAMA) land-use planning guidelines in October. CAMA requires the twenty coastal counties to prepare land-use plans, but planning is optional for municipalities in those counties. The new guidelines offer three levels of plans that give local governments flexibility to meet local needs, while seeking to improve protection of coastal water quality.