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6 results for "Iredell, James, 1751-1799"
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Record #:
15919
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The year 2000 marked the 200th anniversary of James Iredell's death. Some historians argue Iredell was the most prominent man in the state and a nationally respected gentleman during the 18th-century. However, the article focuses on his personal qualities which made him a grand man to friends and family.
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Record #:
3338
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James Iredell, Sr., is one of only two North Carolinians ever appointed to the United States Supreme Court. His dissenting opinion in the case of Chisholm v. Georgia was the basis for the Eleventh Amendment.
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Record #:
2701
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James Iredell, Sr., jurist, statesman, and Revolutionary War patriot, is one of only two North Carolinians ever appointed to the United States Supreme Court.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 9, Feb 1996, p33, por
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Record #:
30814
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As NC state archaeologist and volunteers set out to begin an excavation of the Chowan County Courthouse, Hurricane Agnes struck Edenton and the rains that followed postponed the dig. The group moved to the site of another state-owned property that needed excavation. The cellar of the James Iredell House not only provided a relatively dry place to work, but also yielded plenty of kitchen and houseware artifacts.
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Record #:
10456
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Griffin recounts the life of James Iredell, Sr. -- patriot of the Revolution, state judge, state attorney general, and United States Supreme Court justice.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 25 Issue 1, May 1967, p17-18, 30-31, il, por
Record #:
19730
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Abstract:
A look at the background, the politics and at other positions taken by Supreme Court Justice James Iredell to provide context to, and some explanation for, his dissenting opinion in the case Chisholm v. Georgia. Justice Iredell was a member of the first supreme court of the United States and was appointed by President George Washington in 1790. In Chisholm v. Georgia (1793), Iredell as the lone dissenter supported the position of law that would preclude suits by citizens of one state against another state, a result that was ultimately accomplished through the adoption of the Eleventh Amendment.
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