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18 results for "History--North Carolina"
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Record #:
27522
Author(s):
Abstract:
This photo essay shows the changes that development and time have brought the Triangle area. Photos from the past are paired with photos of the same places as they are in 1989. The locations include: Wonderland Theatre (1920), Watts Hospital (1909), IBM Site (1965), Hargett Street (1940), Fayetteville Street (1959), Carolina Barber Shop (1954), and Crook’s Fish & Produce Market (1951).
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 10, May 4-10 1989, p13-17 Periodical Website
Record #:
19074
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the archives of 19th century North Carolinian M. Luther Stirewalt, Jr. family letters illustrate the vast, untapped potential in North Carolina historical records. Letters, the best known source of long distance communication during the 19th century, provide insight into the culture, history, and daily life of historical North Carolinians.
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Record #:
27809
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the 150th anniversary of the Civil War arriving soon, the effects of the war are still felt in several ways. The way the event is being celebrated angers some, but has changed to include diverse views and be more inclusive than celebrations in the past. However, some groups still celebrate the South as they believe it was and should be through hate groups. Modern connections are also drawn between the exploitation of people and the modern exploitation of the environment. Historians and archivists share their opinions on the effects of the war, what has changed, and what hasn’t.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p22-25 Periodical Website
Record #:
15913
Abstract:
In 2000, the Department of Public Instruction proposed cutting required classes in state history to eighth graders. State history was integrated into the curricula in the 1940s and the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources in conjunction with the Division of Archives and History was placed in charge of defeating measures such as that posed in 2000.
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Record #:
23413
Author(s):
Abstract:
These are excerpts from a book to be published in the future entitled “The Forgotten Tales of North Carolina,” by Tom Painter and Roger Kammerer. The first story is about a man named Spence preaching “Sanctification” in Wake County, who secretly set up a series of posts and planks in a local pond to demonstrate his ability to walk on water in April 1898. The night before his stunt, pranksters removed one of the planks, and when Spence attempted his “miracle” the next day in front of a crowd he fell into the pond. For many years a 90-foot whalebone once acted as a bridge across Fishing Creek from the Nash to the Halifax county side. At a Confederate reunion in Durham, N.C. in 1914, General J.S. Carr and Major J.M. Hamilton got into a heated argument and slapped each other. On February 25, 1853, in Tarboro, NC, at the peculiar hour of midnight, Miss Sarah Susan Elizabeth Panza Mills and Senor Don Alonzo Edgar Howard were married, after one hour’s acquaintance. In 1899, a farmer in Halifax County found a tin of gold coins while plowing his field. The coins, a foreign, dated from 1715 to 1775.
Record #:
23384
Author(s):
Abstract:
These are excerpts from a book to be published in the future entitled “The Forgotten Tales of North Carolina,” by Tom Painter and Roger Kammerer. The first story is about a man named Spence preaching “Sanctification” in Wake County, who secretly set up a series of posts and planks in a local pond to demonstrate his ability to walk on water in April 1898. The night before his stunt, pranksters removed one of the planks, and when Spence attempted his “miracle” the next day in front of a crowd he fell into the pond. For many years a 90-foot whalebone once acted as a bridge across Fishing Creek from the Nash to the Halifax county side. At a Confederate reunion in Durham, N.C. in 1914, General J.S. Carr and Major J.M. Hamilton got into a heated argument and slapped each other. On February 25, 1853, in Tarboro, NC, at the peculiar hour of midnight, Miss Sarah Susan Elizabeth Panza Mills and Senor Don Alonzo Edgar Howard were married, after one hour’s acquaintance. In 1899, a farmer in Halifax County found a tin of foreign gold coins from 1715 to 1775, while plowing in his field.
Record #:
31666
Author(s):
Abstract:
The traditions of history abound in North Carolina, offering travelers rich and rewarding glimpses of the past. There are nineteen sites which have been officially designated as State Historic Sites. These sites range from a 16th century Indian ceremonial center to varied reminders of wartime battles fought in North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, May 1974, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
12140
Author(s):
Abstract:
Containing a series of photos that depict North Carolina farm living conditions in 1840, this is not an article but rather a few photos that depict a particular property from the period.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 12, Nov 1956, p12-13, il
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Record #:
30539
Author(s):
Abstract:
Viewing NC places through its architecture can provide information on past ways of life and their changes though time. Preservation should not only focus on the best examples of architectural types, as the commonness in which a style was used, and its variations are all part of its significance.
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Record #:
20847
Abstract:
Dr. Lefler outlines the extent of State history written to date, as well as proposing areas in need of further historical examination including state settlement, immigration, economics, military affairs, political history, criminal law, slavery, religious history, health, science, medicine, biography, regional studies and city histories, among others.
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Record #:
34864
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Abstract:
The Great Flood of 1940 in North Carolina was caused by days of torrential downpours from a hurricane. Landslides caused by the rain and clear-cutting mountainsides engulfed several towns, killing twelve people and ruining hundreds of properties. This article remembers those that died and the impact the landslides had on the towns they crushed.
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Record #:
34282
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state boundaries of North Carolina are more than just lines on a map; they have led to tales of love and murder, pride and confusion, new islands and old disputes. Twenty stories describe how history, geography, race, culture, politics, and geophysical events that have shaped North Carolina, the Outer Banks and newly formed Shelly Island.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 12, May 2018, p90-121, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
21153
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article traces a decline in the professionalism of the study of history in the 1960s and 1970s in both North Carolina and the field at large.
Record #:
28130
Author(s):
Abstract:
Progressive changes have taken place in the Triangle art scene and the area’s performance venues over the last 25 years. There have been changes in the location of the state art museum, renovations at the Raleigh Memorial Auditorium, the addition of Durham’s Performing Arts Center, and renovations of UNC’s Memorial Hall. The history of opera, ballet, theater over the last 25 years and their place in the community are also detailed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 15, April 2008, p49 Periodical Website
Record #:
18987
Author(s):
Abstract:
Town planning has a rich history within the state dating back to the colonial era and the article specifically describes the state's planned communities and associated developments. Beginning with Bath in 1704, the author focuses on European and especially German influences over town planning. Moving through the 19th and 20th century, places like Pinehurst and Biltmore village provide later examples of the state's cultivated communities.
Source:
North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 20 Issue 11; 12, Nov/Dec 1973, p16-21, il