NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


30 results for "Historic sites"
Currently viewing results 16 - 30
Previous
PAGE OF 2
Record #:
6274
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many cities and towns across the state responded to the needs caused by the disastrous Hurricane Isabel. Lail describes the aid given to a number of cities, including Edenton. Outside help came from Kentucky, Tennessee, South Carolina, and Texas.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 53 Issue 12, Dec 2003, p7, il
Record #:
6379
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lail describes the effects of Hurricane Isabel, which roared across eastern North Carolina in six hours on September 18, 2003. Many cities and towns, including Edenton, Elizabeth City, Manteo, and Windsor are still putting things back together three months later.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 53 Issue 12, Dec 2003, p5-6, il
Record #:
7205
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wright describes the Civil War Trails program, a three-state, federally funded program that seeks to increase recognition of Civil War history at sites in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. In North Carolina the new driving trails recall the state's pivotal role in the Civil War. Over one hundred markers are included in North Carolina's first section of the trail, most of them placed for the very first time. Red, white, and blue signs sporting bugles direct visitors to the sites. Bentonville, Fort Fisher, forts on the Outer Banks, and Plymouth are included in stage one. Second stage markers will focus on the war's action in the western part of the state.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 5, May 2005, p56-57, il
Record #:
7208
Abstract:
The Civil War ended in North Carolina 140 years ago. A number of historical sites mark critical events of the war that occurred in the Coastal Plain and the Piedmont. Beginning in January 2005, a number of commemorative events were held at sites including Fort Fisher, Fort Anderson, Bentonville, and Bennett Place.\r\n\r\n
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
7333
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Civil War Trails program is a three-state, federally funded program that seeks to increase recognition of Civil War history at sites in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. In North Carolina the new driving trails recall the state's pivotal role in the Civil War. Over forty-one of the state's counties participate in the program, and one hundred and five markers stand along the first section of the trail. Markers include photos, illustrations, maps, and text. The second stage of trail development will focus on the war's action in the western part of the state.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p146-149, il, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
8832
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Elizabeth II, a 16th-century sailing ship, will be formally opened July 13, 1984, as part of the state's 400th Anniversary festivities. The ship will become North Carolina's only mobile historic site. Permanently based in Manteo, the Elizabeth II will on occasion visit other communities along the coast of North Carolina. The 50-ton vessel took 15 months to build.
Source:
Record #:
30362
Author(s):
Abstract:
Along North Carolina's 70,000 miles of state highway, there are now seven hundred historic site markers. From Hernando DeSoto's expeditions to Babe Ruth's first home run, markers direct travelers to buildings, sites, roads, battlefields, and churches.
Subject(s):
Record #:
30758
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many of North Carolina’s historic sites saw major damage from Hurricanes Bertha on July 12 and Fran on September 5-6, 1996. While Fort Fisher saw little more than the usual amount of erosion and a sand/debris covered highway due to the newly erected riparian wall, other sites experienced a massive amount of toppled trees and damage to facilities and historic buildings. While most of the NC government offices in Raleigh were closed in the week after, NC State Historic Preservation Office personnel were working to contact preservation officials in all 54 counties in the declared disaster area.
Source:
Record #:
30792
Author(s):
Abstract:
Making history since 1584, North Carolina's historic buildings and artifacts now draw thousands of visitors each year. From the Orton Plantation in Wilmington to the Southern Branch Philadelphia Mint in Charlotte, North Carolina history provides tourists with vast places to explore.
Source:
Record #:
30799
Author(s):
Abstract:
Progress was made on the newest three NC historic sites. In Cabarrus county, stabilizing infrastructure was placed at Reed Gold Mine, the site of the country's first documented discovery of gold. North Carolina is in the process of recording the deed to the 37-acre Duke Homestead site, which will remain a living history site while adding a visitor's center and tobacco history museum. NC is waiting on approval for plans to improve Fort Dobbs in Statesville.
Source:
Record #:
31666
Author(s):
Abstract:
The traditions of history abound in North Carolina, offering travelers rich and rewarding glimpses of the past. There are nineteen sites which have been officially designated as State Historic Sites. These sites range from a 16th century Indian ceremonial center to varied reminders of wartime battles fought in North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, May 1974, p8-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
32611
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recent statistics from North Carolina’s State Historic Sites indicate that the history business is booming. In 1980, there was a ten-percent increase in the number of visitors to the twenty sites operated by the Historic Sites Section of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. This recent trend may be due to the inexpensive costs of visiting state historic sites, better publicity, and improvements in facilities and interpretations of the sites themselves.
Source:
Record #:
34733
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fort Hancock was erected in 1778 to guard the entrance to Cape Lookout. A gift from the French Foreign Ministry, the fort and accompanying munitions and supplies were given to support Americans in their search for freedom. Several Comtes, Generals, and Admirals all served at the fort during the American Revolutionary War. The fort was dismantled in 1780.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2007-2008, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
35773
Abstract:
The author asserted the home, with grounds declared a historic site by the Federal Government, belied significance on many levels. Personal significance was illustrated in the builder naming the house after a town in Ireland. Personal significance can be perceived in the appreciated beauty of Western North Carolina that encouraged the Sandburgs’ move from Michigan. As for its historical significance, that can be gauged in its construction during the antebellum period and the original owner’s position as treasurer for the Confederacy.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p54
Record #:
35777
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author offered descriptions of restored homes such as Halifax’s 1760 Owens House and Kenanville’s 1800 Liberty Hall. Included was description of events such as the Outer Banks village of Rodanthe’s celebration of little Christmas. From the collection of these holiday happenings, revealed was how the Yuletide season was celebrated in the Tarheel State during its pre and post-Colonial days.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p25-26