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6 results for "Fisheries--North Carolina, Eastern"
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Record #:
23838
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, eastern North Carolinians established fisheries along the Roanoke River. Just before the Civil War, W. H. Hampton opened a large fishery just north of Plymouth and the business remained in the family until it closed in 1937.
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Record #:
12622
Author(s):
Abstract:
The reason the modern fisherman has better catches than his father and grandfather is because the new fishing holes are scientifically planned, stocked, fertilized, and managed; whereas the old fishing hole was left to nature. Dotted over the map of North Carolina are more than 2,000 artificial fishing ponds, most constructed to obtain additional income through fishing fees, afford the landowner (sportsmen) a well-stocked fishing site, and to increase the property value of the land.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 2, June 1958, p11, il
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Record #:
37832
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Taylor wrote “Survey of Marine Fisheries of North Carolina” in 1950 and wanted to include a small section of economics in it. However, he then decided to expend on the economic section to avoid superficiality and to consider the fisheries of the entire country, making an assemblage of basic analyses and interpretations.
Record #:
34592
Author(s):
Abstract:
Whaling was a significant industry in early Carteret County. Harvested whale oil and bone sold at a high price. Goodwin provides some price comparisons recorded in the Carteret Court minutes of 1741.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 12 Issue 1-4, 1996, p25
Record #:
4550
Abstract:
Shad and herring fisheries on coastal rivers have fed generations of eastern Carolinians. However, technological innovations, pollution, and overfishing have decreased the size of the annual harvest. Shannon describes the fisheries at Lock and Dam No. 1, Cape Fear River; Contentnea Creek, in Grifton; and the Roanoke River at Jamesville; and their prospects in the twenty-first century.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2000, p6-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
12623
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the discovery of the Gulf Stream moving off our coast only a few years ago, expeditions for sport-fishing have been at an all time high, with access to this mighty \"river\" made possible by the half dozen ports where there are good boats and guides at a modest cost. Until quite recently, few North Carolinians ever ventured out to the Stream, as most sportsmen accomplished their fishing 5 to 15 miles from the western edge of the its boundaries.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 2, June 1958, p24-38, map
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