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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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64 results for "Environmental protection"
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Record #:
5931
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Finfish and shellfish need protection for the coastal habitats that they require for shelter and food. Smith describes the six coastal fisheries habitats, what threatens them, and plans the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources is developing for their protection.
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Record #:
7403
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Lisa Renstrom came to Charlotte twelve years ago. She was executive director of the now-inactive Voices & Choices of the Central Carolinas. The organization sought to foster environmentally friendly development and preservation of open spaces. In 2001, Renstrom was elected to the Sierra Club board of directors. She was re-elected to the position in 2004, and in May 2005, she was chosen the club's fifty-first president.
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Record #:
7539
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Gestwicki describes three wildlife fights that the North Carolina Wildlife Federation undertook to save threatened species and areas. These include work that led to passage by the N.C. General Assembly of the Freshwater Turtle Bill, which mandates strict protection of one of the state's most vulnerable species; creation of riparian buffers, starting in 2002, to protect wildlife in the Catawba River corridors; and opposition which led to the abandonment in 2003 of the proposed Oregon Inlet jetties.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 51 Issue 2, Fall 2003, p1, 3, il
Record #:
7790
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North Carolina's coast remained sparsely populated until the mid-20th-century. The attraction with the coast began with the influx of people during World War II. After hostilities ceased, a building boom began with high-rise hotels, condominium towers, strip malls, and beach houses crowding into environmentally delicate areas. The North Carolina Coastal Federation, organized in 1982, is a nonprofit organization that has a simple mission--protect the coast. La Vere discusses the NCCF's three-pronged strategy for coastal protection and the work of the state's three coastkeepers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p110-112, 114, 116, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7804
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Two of the state's Touchstone Energy cooperatives received recognition for the care they take in the management of trees and other vegetation affecting power lines and poles. Union Power Cooperative is the first North Carolina utility to be named a Tree Line USA Utility. This award is sponsored by the National Arbor Day Foundation and the National Association of State Foresters. The Dow AgroSciences industry magazine, Right-of-Way Vistas, recognized Pee Dee Electric for its right-of-way vegetation management program. The cooperatives serve a region between Charlotte and Lumberton.
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Record #:
7917
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Private groups are taking an increasingly active role in helping wildlife and its critical habits. Venters describes five diverse groups that are working to save the state's wildlife and environment: the North Carolina Wildlife Federation, Ducks unlimited, Trout Unlimited, the National Wild Turkey Federation, and Quail Unlimited.
Record #:
7919
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The North Carolina General Assembly passed the Clean Smokestacks Act almost four years ago to clean up soot and smog-forming pollution from coal-fired power plants. While the act requires power plants to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions from 245,000 tons in 1998 to 56,000 tons by 2009, it does not say what to do about mercury pollution from those plants. Most of the mercury pollution from these plants falls into nearby water bodies, where, in North Carolina, it is quickly converted to its most toxic form. Suttles discusses what needs to be done to reduce this form of pollution which makes some state fish inedible and threatens developing brains and central nervous systems of young children.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p1, 10, il
Record #:
10606
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Due to cooperation between private companies and public interests, phosphate mining wastes, or tailings, are having less of a negative impact on the environment in North Carolina. Legislation to protect streams and rivers from pollution was enacted in 1964 and the Minerals Research Laboratory of North Carolina in Asheville has been offering its assistance to mining companies since 1946. As a result, substantial contributions have been made towards conserving and enhancing the overall value of North Carolina's natural environment and its mineral resources.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 3, July 1970, p10-11, 36, il, por
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Record #:
11127
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Dozens of groups - governmental, environmental, fishing, development, and private citizens - are all functioning at the same time over ways to protect the state's coasts. The issues are complex. Leutze summarizes the status of the coastal areas and the groups working for it.
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Record #:
11154
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North Carolina has worked hard to keep its rivers clean. Earle C. Hubbard, director of the Division of Stream Sanitation and Hydrology talks about the cleanliness of local water. Hubbard noted that a majority of the streams are classified as pure or clean enough to require minimal chemical changes for everyday use. The abundant water resources in the 16 river basins of North Carolina require constant attention to prevent polluters from damaging the water.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 10, Oct 1966, p19, 25, por
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Record #:
15932
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A recent study and survey found that North Carolinians are equally concerned with the extension of economic growth and development as well as concern for the environment.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Fall 1990, p14
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Record #:
18006
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Only recently have people begun to understand the connection between population growth and its effects on the environment. Taylor discusses the effects of roads and cities on the resources, and how local planning and education can prevent damage.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 36 Issue 5, Feb 1970, p1-8
Record #:
23653
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After the cultural shift towards an environmentally friendly way of life, locals in Asheville discuss how they work towards keeping the planet green.
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 2 Issue 6, August 2008, p80-87, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
24048
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Kemp Burdette is a riverkeeper for the Cape Fear River, one of the most important natural resources in North Carolina. Burdette's job is to protect the river from short term--often destructive thinking--and ensure that it will last for the generations to come.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 4, September 2015, p142-144, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24076
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SouthWings is a non-profit organization that serves eleven southeastern states by monitoring environmental degradation and assists in advocating for conservation. It achieves this by taking people of influence on flights to show them the importance and beauty of protected areas.
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