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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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43 results for "Electric utilities"
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Record #:
28669
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More than 100 electric power providers serve nearly 10 million people in North Carolina. These include consumer-owned electric cooperatives, investor-owned utilities, city governments, university-owned utility, or other utilities. The history, service areas, regulations of the electric power providers in the state are described and a map provides the service areas in the state.
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Record #:
35230
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Innovative, according to Lindsey Linstrom, , is defined by the new services provided to customers in the Piedmont region, courtesy of Randy Brecheisen’s efforts. As for this CEO of thirty-three years, he might have also defined it by a considered second career—a new way to define “retirement.”
Record #:
35318
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Visions for the NC’s electrical future were showcased at the recent annual board meeting attended by educational panels, keynote speakers, officers. This meeting featured the election of new members, as well as the presentation of officer reports and service and scholarship awards.
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Record #:
35329
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The pole attachment in question is jointly provided by two companies to avoid having to build their own poles. Or at least building a pole attachment is between two electric cooperatives. For the legal work related to their implications, state legislature is responsible, and this can be a challenging process. With over two million of North Carolinians reliant of coop power, though, the effort can be perceived as worth it.
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35325
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This year’s Electric Cooperative Youth Tour in the nation’s capital offered 43 high school students a chance to see its landmarks. More than that, though, they were given an insider’s view of how the government works and the roles that electric cooperatives play in our lives.
Record #:
35331
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In the midst of The Great Depression, there came signs of prosperity in rural North Carolina that have stretched down over five decades: electricity and electric cooperatives. Profiled is the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, whose impact has become worldwide. Noted are places where NRECA has made a difference, as close as Haiti and as far as the Philippines.
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Record #:
35419
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What is regarded as newsworthy, whether personally or in the pages of Wilmington DE’s Morning News, was relayed in this quintet of stories shared by writers native and not. Newsworthy topics included buildings and an electric cooperative with personal historic value and “fish out of water” style experiences on a bench and in a Central NC town.
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Record #:
35303
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Help involves the use of modern technological tools, but the role that people play in the restoration of electrical power is still crucial. How humans help involved a discussion of the restoration process and how good customer service is a pertinent component of the process.
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Record #:
35421
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The electrical relationship between outlets and receptacles was explored through factors such as type, function, and recommended installation locations for receptacles. For the non-mechanically inclined, included were some interesting facts.
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Record #:
10312
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North Carolina's population is growing rapidly. By 2030, it will reach twelve million, making the state the seventh largest in the nation. Demand for energy is also keeping pace with this growth. Hughes discusses what steps Progress Energy Carolinas (formerly Carolina Power & Light) is taking to meet this increasing need for electricity.
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Record #:
30898
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New energy policy legislation requires electric cooperatives, by 2018, to have ten percent of their total electricity needs generated from renewable resources or displaced through effective energy efficiency programs. More renewable energy for North Carolina will need an upgraded transmission network to go where it will be needed.
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Record #:
30897
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The North Carolina Transmission Planning Collaborative identified seventeen major transmission projects as part of the 2007-2017 Collaborative Transmission Plan for North Carolina. The projects represent more than four-hundred million dollars in investments for improved electric utilities and transmission.
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Record #:
30985
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North Carolina’s electric utilities are including natural gas generation as a bigger part of resource plans, along with renewable energy and efficiency measures, in an effort to make up for delayed coal-fired and nuclear generation. This article discusses natural gas consumption in North Carolina, and bridging the gap between now and when advanced low-emissions power generation technologies become available in the future.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 8, Aug 2008, p10-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9647
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Thomas discusses major issues and concerns facing electric cooperatives today in planning for the future of energy in North Carolina. Among them are growth in state population projected for 50 percent over the next twenty-five years, climate change, energy supply, and costs.
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Record #:
31044
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NC GreenPower was launched in 2003 to encourage the development of renewable energy resources in North Carolina through voluntary, tax-deductible contributions that individuals can make through their electric bills or directly to the program. The minimum contribution level is four-dollars per block of renewable energy generated and added to North Carolina’s power grid.
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