NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


38 results for "Economic conditions--North Carolina"
Currently viewing results 16 - 30
Previous
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
30389
Author(s):
Abstract:
For decades, North Carolina politicians, policy analysts, and interest groups have talked about reforming the state’s antiquated tax code. This article presents different perspectives in the Great Tax Reform Debate of 2013, and discusses challenges in the state economy. Also discussed are recommendations for a form of consumption taxation called the USA Tax, for Unlimited Savings Allowance.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 92 Issue 1, Spring 2013, p23-24, por
Record #:
30388
Author(s):
Abstract:
George Holding is the Representative for North Carolina’s Thirteenth Congressional District, and serves on the Judiciary Committee and the Foreign Affairs Committee. In an interview, Holding discusses his top legislative priorities, threats to the economy, and debt.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 92 Issue 1, Spring 2013, p14, por
Record #:
30397
Author(s):
Abstract:
Economists for the North Carolina Bankers Association discuss the potential impact of several factors on economic growth and future bank profitability. The housing market has improved, and stock markets are at five year highs and record levels. However, the state unemployment rate remains one of the highest in the nation, and bank profitability is likely to decline.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 92 Issue 2, Summer 2013, p22-23, por
Record #:
30396
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mark Meadows is the Representative for North Carolina’s Eleventh Congressional District and a former small business owner. In an interview, Meadows discusses his top legislative priorities, threats to the banking industry, regulations and economic conditions in North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 92 Issue 2, Summer 2013, p14, por
Record #:
30414
Abstract:
The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act was the primary legislative response to the Great Recession and the meltdown of Wall Street that started in 2007. This article reviews the findings of a survey sent to the CEOs of North Carolina chartered banks. The results cover various topics regarding the type and degree of impact on banks.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 92 Issue 3, Fall 2013, p53-55, il, por
Record #:
30411
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the January State of the State address, Governor Pat McCrory discussed how the state’s government and economy were broken. McCrory explained that fixing the economy, improving the education system, and increasing efficiency in government would be the administration’s top priorities.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 92 Issue 3, Fall 2013, p16-17, por
Record #:
30441
Author(s):
Abstract:
Richard Hudson was elected in 2012 to represent North Carolina’s Eighth Congressional District. In an interview, Hudson discusses his background in politics and top legislative priorities. Hudson believes community-generated solutions will help stabilize and grow the state’s economy.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 92 Issue 4, Winter 2013, p14, por
Record #:
30450
Author(s):
Abstract:
The falling labor participation rate in North Carolina is making it harder for the economy to experience strong economic growth. Further, the number of banks continues to drop, and merger activity is expected to increase over the next couple years in the state. This article discusses employment and economic trends, and new regulations for financial institutions.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 93 Issue 1, Spring 2014, p19-20, por
Record #:
30476
Author(s):
Abstract:
Economic growth in the United States increased in the beginning of 2014, but has been declining since June. In North Carolina, the employment rate is still not back to the level before the recession, and bank profitability has stalled. These trends are driven by struggles in consumer income, salaries and wages.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 93 Issue 3, Fall 2014, p51-52, por
Record #:
30500
Abstract:
In comparison to 1985, economic growth in the Wilmington, North Carolina area slowed to a moderate pace over 1986 of approximately five percent, its long-term historical trend. Forecasts predict that growth in 1987 will match that of 1986. At the national level, growth will slow in 1987 but, as of yet, there is no recession in sight.
Source:
Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Jan 1987, p11-14, il, bibl, f
Record #:
30507
Abstract:
The year 1986 was a better than average year for the local economy. A mid-year review of local economic activity indicates that 1987 will be similar to 1986, and there is no immediate danger of a national recession. The dollar has continued to fall against other major currencies because of the uncertainty which has characterized United States trade policy.
Source:
Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 2, July 1987, p11-14, bibl, f
Record #:
30584
Abstract:
The Wilmington, North Carolina area economy grew by approximately five percent over 1987. A mid-year review of local economic activity indicates that 1988 will be similar to 1987. At the national level, restrictive monetary policy enacted in 1987 will cause a slowdown in economic activity beginning in the second half of 1988 and continuing into 1989.
Source:
Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, July 1988, p15-17, il, bibl, f
Record #:
30581
Abstract:
Economic activity in the Wilmington, North Carolina area has grown over the first three quarters of 1987, and growth in the six percent range is forecast for 1988. If the Federal Reserve System follows a moderately expansionary monetary policy, the national economy should grow by approximately three percent over 1988.
Source:
Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Jan 1988, p8-11, il, bibl, f
Record #:
30592
Abstract:
Over the first half of 1988, economic activity in the Wilmington, North Carolina area grew at an annual rate of twelve percent. Forecasted growth for this area in 1989 is predicted to be approximately nine percent. The national economy should grow during 1989, assuming that the Federal Reserve System does not restrict monetary growth.
Source:
Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan 1989, p16-18, il, bibl, f
Record #:
30597
Abstract:
The Wilmington, North Carolina area economy grew by approximately three percent over 1988. A mid-year review indicates that the local economy will grow by approximately six percent over 1989. At the national level, the inflation outlook is good and a recession appears very unlikely.
Source:
Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, July 1989, p12-15, il, bibl, f