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5 results for "Drug abuse"
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Record #:
32051
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles Dunn, Director of the State Bureau of Investigation, discusses the scope of the drug problem in North Carolina. The illegal possession and misuse of drugs is a growing problem, not only of law enforcement, but of all those concerned with the health and well-being of people. Dunn, citing examples, says the only hope of curbing drug abuse lies in the home, the church, the school and the community.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 5, May 1971, p9-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27137
Author(s):
Abstract:
A heroin epidemic has arisen in North Carolina and across the nation. Associated problems are HIV and hepatitis C spread by the sharing of needles. Now there are needle-exchange programs to protect addicts from infectious diseases and offer support to help them get clean.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 19, May 2016, p10, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
204
Author(s):
Abstract:
Project Phoenix is a multi-pronged effort designed to prevent the sale and use of illegal drugs in Raleigh, especially in known trouble spots.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 42 Issue 4, Apr 1992, p1-8, il
Record #:
4847
Author(s):
Abstract:
One-fourth, or around 1,900 of North Carolina's over 8,100 AIDS cases, are the result of drug users exchanging dirty needles. The Institute of Medicine, a national think tank, proposes a needle-exchange program, whereby drug users can turn in used needles for clean ones. The program is not without its critics, who cite giving drug users drug paraphernalia. There are 100 exchange programs nationwide. North Carolina's only program is in Asheville.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 41, Oct 2000, p14-15, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
2941
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ritalin, a prescription drug used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD), is increasingly in use by non-ADD middle and high school students as a means of getting high or staying awake.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 14 Issue 13, Mar 1996, p8-10, il Periodical Website