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11 results for "Cupola House (Edenton)"
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Record #:
36269
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Abstract:
The measurement of Edenton’s historical significance to North Carolina extends back the mid eighteenth century, when it was the state capital. The measure of its history extends to modern day, with the town’s efforts to preserve its Colonial roots. This is evident in facilities such as the courthouse, built in 1767, and historic houses such as the Barker House, built in 1783.
Record #:
15039
Author(s):
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The Cupola House, built in Edenton in 1758, is one of the state's most historic buildings. The gardens that surround the house follow the design laid out in a detailed 1769 map, and they are maintained by a group of volunteer Edenton citizens.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p188-190, 192, 194, 196, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30991
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In March 1918, citizens in Edenton, North Carolina formed the Cupola House Association, which was probably the earliest landmark preservation project in the state. The Cupola House was built in 1758 by Francis Corbin to serve as a residence for John Carteret, son of the last of the land-holding Lords Proprietors of the Carolinas. Reflecting a style of wealth in the American colonies, it is considered a fine example of Jacobean architecture in the South.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 9, Sept 2008, p21, il
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Record #:
2300
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Dendrochronology, a way to date trees, has been refined by Dr. Herman J. Heikkenen and is now a valuable research tool for state historians in accurately dating historic buildings, like Edenton's Cupola House.
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Record #:
17
Abstract:
Researchers are using the method of dendrochronology to determine the construction date of the historic Cupola House in Edenton.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 83, Fall 1991, p1, il
Record #:
21885
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article discusses the early history and significance of the Cupola House in Edenton from 1724 to 1777. One of the most architecturally significant homes in North Carolina and built in the state's third oldest incorporated town, the Cupola House has a storied and colorful history that reflects the changing nature of North Carolina.
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Record #:
21886
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This article analyses the Cupola House in Edenton as a cultural object for chronology, style, and technology. Through examination of the house, a mixture of architecture and technology can be identified which assist in cementing the Cupola House as an important structure to the history of North Carolina.
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Record #:
21479
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This article examines the architecturally distinguished Cupola House of Edenton and the steps taken to preserve the house. Built by Richard Sanderson in the 1720s, the house was a blend of Jacobean and early Georgian styles. After the house came into the possession of Dr. Samuel Dickinson in 1777, it remained in his family until 1918. In 1918, then owner Tillie Bond sold the first floor woodwork to the Brooklynn Museum to the community's outrage. A grass roots movement was organized by local residents to purchase the house and preserve it as a historic site.
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Record #:
35579
Author(s):
Abstract:
The historic trail of Eastern NC, covering towns such as Fayetteville and Windsor, was a road with plenty of landmarks. Contained for the tourists’ consideration were many of the state’s acre bound treasures—over two thirds, according to the author. Examples of these historic properties were Charles B. Aycock’s birthplace and the James Iredell House.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Aug/Sept 1973, p30-31
Record #:
14373
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses the history of Chowan County from the colonial period through contemporary history. Historic landmarks described include: Cupola House, Bandon Plantation, and the Chowan County Courthouse.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 41, Mar 1949, p6-7, 15, il
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