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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for "Core Sound"
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Record #:
25093
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fishing and work boats all have a history. This may be reflected in the name or in an oral history of the vessel. As years go by, the boats themselves, like the fishermen, have had to adapt to new changes.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2014, p6-11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
38298
Author(s):
Abstract:
Called sound country by the author, North Carolina attained this status by having more sounds than any other state in the east. Its importance may be better defined, however, by the role that sounds like Currituck have played in defining a way of life for Eastern North Carolinians and the region’s seafood industry for centuries.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p96-98, 100, 102-104, 106, 108, 110, 112, 114 Periodical Website
Record #:
24477
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Core Sound Decoy Festival is held in Carteret County every year and highlights the best duck decoy carvers in the nation. Carvers and collectors come from all the over the national to attend the festival, which was started in 1987 by the Core Sound Decoy Carvers Guild.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 6, November 1991, p26-28, il
Full Text:
Record #:
36029
Author(s):
Abstract:
Glimpses of the past were perhaps seen most clearly in this collection of photos. One was a reminder of when the ferry was the only source of transport for humans and cargo. Others were reminders of businesses long since gone out of business, as well as buildings still standing. Most the photos, though, attested the importance of waterways around the Island, whether the creek familiarly known as the “Slash,” Core Sound, or Atlantic Ocean.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p30-39
Record #:
9583
Author(s):
Abstract:
Core Sound lies along the North Carolina coast near Beaufort. Although it is nearly twenty-eight miles in length, it is rarely more than three miles wide. The hustle and bustle of today's tourist industry has bypassed many of Core Sound's communities, such as Davis and Atlantic; thus they provide a glimpse into old-time coastal living. Boating through Core Sound can be dangerous as most of the sound's waterways are only a few feet deep.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 12, May 1984, p7-9, il, map
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
36015
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between the Coast Guard, naval yard, and commercial fisheries work of many kinds, Mr. Robert Watson Gray had gained almost a lifetime of maritime experience. After retirement, with much of his days taken up by fishing, he showed how the lure of the open sea still reeled him in.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p52-59
Record #:
35809
Author(s):
Abstract:
Noted first were reasons to appreciate the Coast and its waters, particularly sites that lend appeal. Land marks ranged from the well-known Outer Banks to perhaps lesser known Bird’s Island. Towns included famed Kittyhawk to the famed by relatively few Duck. As for what he saw as evidence of being taken for granted: pollution of air and water, destruction to dunes and wildlife. Out of an enduring appreciation for, and mounting concern about, he called for all North Carolinians to restore the Coast and its waters for future generations and out of a sacred duty.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p40-42, 56-60