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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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12 results for "Climate--North Carolina"
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Record #:
27813
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Abstract:
Weather has always connected people, for weather is one of the strongest natural forces in human lives. Many people without scientific backgrounds are making discoveries, including David Herring, who has developed his own home weather station. This article is an excerpt from Dr. Caren Cooper’s new book, “Citizen Science: How Ordinary People Are Changing the Face of Discovery.”
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Winter 2017, p4-5, il, por
Record #:
27628
Abstract:
Hurricane Matthew’s outer bands hit Eastern North Carolina on October 8th, but the damage from that storm will take months and even years to recover from. The Cape Fear, Lumber, Neuse, and Tar Rivers saw record-breaking flood levels and coastal communities experienced immense storm surges. Many people were displaced, but fortunately FEMA funds will assist with the efforts to find homes for those affected.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2016, p18-23, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27627
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Sea Grant’s mission is to improve the natural resource management decisions made by the state. The organization believes the most effective way to accomplish their goal is to work with communities to improve public understanding of the issues. To succeed in this endeavor, Sea Grant has begun working with K-12 schools to better educate students about climate and natural resources.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2016, p6-8, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29714
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Abstract:
The Collider opened in March in downtown Asheville, North Carolina as a place where climate service professionals come together to collaborate on innovation within the industry. The Collider’s location offers proximity to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency’s National Centers for Environmental Information.
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Record #:
27761
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Abstract:
The effect that climate change will have on North Carolina’s agriculture is explored. Participants and presenters from The Abundance Foundation’s conference share their experiences with the effects of climate change on their farms and production and their research on how climate change could affect the practice of farming in North Carolina. The increase in temperatures, variability of weather, and water supply are the topics of most concern.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 10, March 2013, p14-17 Periodical Website
Record #:
34346
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Abstract:
According to the North Carolina Drought Monitoring Council, above-normal precipitation since September associated with the El Niño warm event in the Pacific has significantly reversed drought conditions across North Carolina. The State Climate Office expects above normal precipitation through the spring, which should allow water supplies across the state to be in much better condition than last year.
Record #:
34335
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Abstract:
At a meeting of the North Carolina Drought Monitoring Council on November 8, representatives said that many of North Carolina’s major cities are experiencing “top ten” dry conditions with rainfall deficits exceeded only by the drought of 1986. Precipitation across the state has been from 10-25 inches below normal for the last twenty-four months.
Record #:
16914
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Abstract:
Environmental education emphasizes that the entire world is linked ecologically. Climatic phenomena in one region may influence conditions in other regions, even at great distances. Edgell argues that there is a need for more studies on global atmospheric circulation systems and their links to inter-regional climate patterns that affect southeastern North Carolina.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 7 Issue , 1999, p12-22, map, bibl, f
Record #:
34301
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Abstract:
According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Pacific cold sea surface event called La Niña is persisting and is predicted to hold on into 2000. The longer-term climate effects in North Carolina could be a continued deficit of normal rainfall into the spring. Because La Niña increases hurricane activity in the Atlantic, the state could see increased storm activity in the fall and short-term relief from drought conditions.
Record #:
16900
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Abstract:
In this article, Robinson discusses the climate differences between North Carolina's Piedmont and mountain regions.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 5 Issue , Winter 1996, p11-20, map, bibl, f
Record #:
34203
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to the United States Geological Survey’s National Water Conditions, temperatures were above normal throughout most of the nation in July. In North Carolina, streamflow values declined statewide for the third month in a row but remained at average to slightly above average levels. Rainfall, streamflow, groundwater, and reservoir levels in July and August are presented in this article.
Record #:
31393
Author(s):
Abstract:
Given North Carolina's hospitable, mild climate, the state is popular for living and visiting year-round from coast to mountains. The ranges from sub-tropical temperatures in the southeast to temperate temperatures elsewhere, makes North Carolina favorable for industry. The mild geographic climate lessens costs for construction, fuel and maintenance, and encourages operations both indoors and outdoors.
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