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68 results for "Cherokee Indians--North Carolina"
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Record #:
11480
Author(s):
Abstract:
Provost recounts incidents in the life of the famous Cherokee chief, Junaluska. He and other Cherokees saved Andrew Jackson's life at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend in 1814; yet when Jackson was President, he ordered the removal of the Cherokees to the West in 1838. Junaluska later returned to North Carolina, a 'chief without a tribe,' and settled in Graham County, where he died in 1858. In 1910, a monument was erected there to his memory.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 32, Jan 1934, p5, 22, il
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Record #:
11557
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Prevost discusses the federal government's educational program that it is providing schooling to five hundred Cherokee students in western North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 36, Feb 1934, p17, 26, il
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Record #:
13053
Author(s):
Abstract:
In response to a claim that there were no Cherokees in Cherokee County, the author provides the location and numbers of all registered Cherokees in North Carolina counties. New definitions of what an Indian may be are examined, as well the challenges faced when registering peoples of Indian inter-marriage as one tribe or the other. Often the government does not recognize the origins of certain groups of people, and therefore may overlook the Cherokees hidden in the mix.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 1, June 1955, p13-14, map
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Record #:
13166
Author(s):
Abstract:
With an estimated 2,800 individuals comprising North Carolina's Cherokee Indian Nation, the indigenous peoples of the state were at one time considered the most progressive tribe in America.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 5, July 1954, p10-11, il
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Record #:
13320
Author(s):
Abstract:
Qualla Town, located in Haywood County, is an area encompassing 72,000 acres of land inhabited by the Cherokee and Catawba Native Americans. Divided into seven clans, each of which is managed by a chief, the indigenous peoples of this area still function and practice beliefs despite the widespread Native American removal that devastated tribes and belief systems elsewhere in North America.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 14, Dec 1954, p15-16, 24, il
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Record #:
13329
Author(s):
Abstract:
An early traveler describes Native American Cherokee stick-ball through observations conducted in Qualla Town, North Carolina, 1848.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 16, Jan 1955, p16, 36, il
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Record #:
13347
Author(s):
Abstract:
In an excerpt from the 1848 book, Letters from the Alleghanies, Lanman offers an alternate view on Cherokee extermination within North Carolina. The first of two part series published by The State, Lanman discusses various Cherokee chiefs as well as religion.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 19, Feb 1955, p14-15
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Record #:
13393
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the fascinating opportunities in North Carolina is the profession of \"chiefing\" practiced in and around Cherokee. This is the business of putting on feathers and standing in front of some souvenir shops. Some thirty chiefs work at Cherokee tourist places.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 19, Oct 1953, p3, f
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Record #:
13554
Author(s):
Abstract:
Deep in the Smokies, visitors can see how Cherokees have kept their ancient arts alive.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 49, May 1954, p14-16, 51, f
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Record #:
13658
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Cherokee Historical Association expects to bring to life, on a 39-acre wooded tract near the Mountain Side Theatre, a Cherokee village such as these mountain-dwelling Indians lived in two hundred years ago.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 27, Dec 1951, p4-5, 17, f
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Record #:
13749
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Cherokees named a famous valley in the Great Smokies, Catalochee, from the way the ridges rose.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 39, Feb 1952, p7, il
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Record #:
13773
Author(s):
Abstract:
Oconaluftee was the original name of a village destroyed by Colonel Moore on the banks of the river also named Oconaluftee.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 43, Mar 1952, p8, il
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Record #:
13881
Author(s):
Abstract:
The reconstructed Ocanaluftee Cherokee Village offers spectators a chance to view Native Americans in their natural setting. Representations of traditional art work, boat building, and architecture are captured in photographic illustrations that are meant to depict life 200 years ago.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 51, May 1953, p12-14, il
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Record #:
14078
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Abstract:
The author outlines both Native American and contemporary lore about snakes, including religious and medicinal qualities. Cherokee religion believed rattlesnakes to be men in a different form. Dr. John Brickell's writing included snake folklore in Natural History of North Carolina. There is also a discussion about North Carolina snake lore, with folktales and medicinal/therapeutic qualities of native snake species.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 2, June 1948, p9, 22
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Record #:
14136
Abstract:
Old Bird Partridge, a Cherokee Indian, still works his magic, even though the younger generation doesn't put much faith in his methods.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 19, Oct 1949, p3-4, 20, f
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