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25 results for "Carteret County--Social life and customs"
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Record #:
34669
Abstract:
This article discusses some of the author’s earliest memories of Morehead City. Visiting family during WWII, the author recalls the blackout practices put into effect to deter enemy attacks on shipping vessels. Houses and cars blacked out their lights while an alarm would sound in town to alert residents of nightfall. Post-war, the author describes local vernacular boatbuilding traditions and boat usage.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Spring 2002, p7-10, il, por
Record #:
34728
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article addresses the practice of hog killing as remembered by the author. An annual event that happened between Thanksgiving and early January, community members would gather to butcher and process hogs raised on local farms. The author discusses butchery practices and some of the recipes used by their family. Many of the cuts of meat required additional preservation including salting, drying, smoking, or canning.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p11-13, il
Record #:
34741
Author(s):
Abstract:
The second in a series of three articles, this segment addresses the life of Daniel Reid between February and April, 1896. Daily diary entries from Reid provide insight into clerical duties and family life outside of the Church. As a local Methodist minister, Reid was required to travel locally for work and his writing documents many interactions with local communities. Due to their location in southeast North Carolina, Reid and his family also dealt extensively with malaria which is an on-going theme in the accounts.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2005, p16-25, il, por, map
Record #:
34754
Author(s):
Abstract:
Community stores were a tradition in 20th century Carteret County. Carrying everything from food stuffs to household items, every store kept personalized accounts for each family. The author recalls each of the nine stores selling specialty items—one is remembered as carrying fresh farm produce, for example, while another sold handmade Moon Pies. Kib’s Store, in particular, was memorable due to it’s shotgun architectural style and distinctive lean.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p12-13, il
Record #:
34785
Author(s):
Abstract:
The annual Lukens homecoming is held to remember the small community of Lukens in Carteret County. First settled during the 18th century, town residents began leaving following extensive damage from the 1933 hurricane. Today, Lukens descendants and family members return once a year to share histories of the community. Descriptions of the town and residents are given by those present. A trip to Lukens follows the remembrances. Today, some of the Lukens structures are still standing in South River, North Carolina.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall-Spring 2009-2010, p7-8, il
Record #:
34784
Abstract:
Bryan Salter worked for the Grit newspaper as a paperboy during his youth. Popular in southern states, the newspaper hired teens and pre-teens to deliver the paper to local residents once a week. Salter recalls various local teens employed by the paper; many of their customers were relatives or family friends. Eventually, the newspapers circulation declined and today it is no longer delivered to a subscriber base.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall-Spring 2009-2010, p2-3, il, por
Record #:
35167
Author(s):
Abstract:
A retelling of Midsummer Eve ritualistic practices done by Mrs. Deyo in her youth. These practices were supposed to give clues as to whom the girls would marry.
Record #:
36987
Abstract:
Through decoy carving, the man also known as “Brother” upkeeps a local tradition, while up keeping a name for himself in national collections and competitions.
Record #:
35970
Author(s):
Abstract:
One tale involved whiskey runners during the Prohibition, which inspired the transcribed tune about the town's role in the flourishing of the alcohol trade. Another story that could be considered legend involved the crew of the Crissie Wright, a ship first found drifting around Diamond Shoals. Added to the mystery were the frozen crew of the ship whose drifting ended in Beaufort harbor. The discovery inspired a saying still known in Carteret County, “cold as the night the Crissie Wright came ashore.”
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p22-23
Record #:
36188
Author(s):
Abstract:
The capital of Carteret County has had a long history in the Crystal Coast. Dubbed Fish Town in the early 1700s, the town received its next moniker from John Motley Morehead in the 1850s. Incorporated as Morehead City in 1861, the town lives up to its original identity through its famous Blue Marlin Tournament, Seafood Festival, and Sanitary Fish Market and Restaurant.
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