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9 results for "Carteret County--Economic conditions"
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Record #:
7817
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carteret County is the subject of this month's North Carolina magazine community profile. The county provides visitors with miles of beaches; historical sites, including Beaufort, the state's third-oldest town, and Fort Macon, a Civil War site; environmental attractions, including the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores; and water adventures, including diving, kayaking, and sailing. The county boasts a number of art galleries, fine restaurants, and shops. Tourism is a big driver of the economy as well as residential and commercial development that is fueled by high-end retirees and second-homeowners. Located just north of Beaufort, Open Grounds Farm, at 45,000 acres, is the largest farm east of the Mississippi River.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 4, Apr 2006, p29-30, 33-34, 37-39, 41-42, 44, il
Record #:
575
Author(s):
Abstract:
Steeped in a history tied to the sea, Carteret County is ready to set sail toward a new destiny characterized by international trade and a booming tourism industry.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 6, June 1991, p22-39, il
Record #:
29223
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carteret County, who's Crystal Coast has attracted visitors for centuries, is growing thanks to continued travel and tourism. Along with tourism, commercial fishing is also thriving, as well as beach recreation, and various manufacturing ventures (i.e. boat building, phosphate, fiberglass, fish meal and oil, apparel, port facilities, and others).
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 6, June 1991, p23-24, 26, 28, 32-39, por
Record #:
13247
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carteret County, s rare combination of industry, agriculture, travel trade, commercial fishing, and ocean overland commerce, is an area rich with opportunities. Sharpe presents the geography, history, and industries of the county.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 4, June 1953, p3-5, 33-36, 38, map, f
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Record #:
8062
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since the mid-1970s, beach development has been largely confined to North Carolina's shoreline. Hotels, family homes, and campgrounds gradually changed to condos, high-end housing, and gated communities. As the shoreline filled up, development began moving inland from the coasts, and condominium complexes and housing communities are springing up along inland waterways. In Carteret County, the development is threatening a way of life for many families who can trace their ancestry back to the mid-1700s. Fishing families and boat builders find surviving difficult when dealing with rising taxes, poor markets, and loss of fish houses, boat yards, and boat docks.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 23 Issue 23, June 2006, p14, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
13249
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Abstract:
Old towns and new thrive in the new awaking of eastern North Carolina. Carteret County is developing with new ports, but fishing is still king. Pleasants details the little cities of Carteret County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 4, June 1953, p12-16, f
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Record #:
3938
Abstract:
While tourism pumps $195 million into Carteret County's economy, it isn't the only revenue source. Two new industrial parks, one focusing on marine industries, will open in 1999. In addition, research facilities and employers like Atlantic Veneer and Carteret General Hospital also fuel a growing economy.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 11, Nov 1998, p33-35,38,41-44, il
Record #:
39726
Author(s):
Abstract:
A National Science Foundation grant-funded study examined the relationship between these factors: an economy driven by industries such as tourism and defense; public policies; a 301-mile shoreline vulnerable to elevating sea levels and more frequent hurricanes. The study’s goal: predict how culminated climatic changes will impact people’s receptiveness to buying property in counties such as Dare, Carteret, and New Hanover.
Record #:
35871
Author(s):
Abstract:
This feud’s source was not of the Hatfield and McCoy ilk: it was a refinery for Carteret County. Pete Dorrance owned the business he promised was economically sound and environmentally clean. Against it was John Costlow, director of Duke University Marine Laboratory. He asserted a threat of oil spills carried an ecological damage price tag too high to pay.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p14-17