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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for "Camping--North Carolina, Western"
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Record #:
23797
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eustace Conway is a modern mountain man who grows, finds, or hunts his own food. He owns 1,000 acres at Turtle Island Preserve in Boone, North Carolina and is dedicated to creating a completely natural environment for visitors.
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Record #:
3384
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's mountains offer camping to appeal to every taste, from rustic backwoods to well-equipped sites. Among the most popular are the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Nantahala and Pisgah national forests.
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Record #:
15163
Abstract:
Camps for boys and girls both along the coast and in the mountains outnumbered those in any other state. As reported in 1942, more than a million dollars was spent on camping within the state. One such camp was Camp Sequoyah located 16 miles from Asheville. This boys' camp covered 125 acres, had 42 buildings, and included athletic fields, a private lake, tennis courts, outdoor theater space, and riding field. Camp goers could engage in typical activities including nature and art lessons, carpentry, boating, etc.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 46, Apr 1942, p5, 20, il
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Record #:
15354
Author(s):
Abstract:
Western North Carolina became a popular destination for campers during the 1930s. CCC workers constructed and enlarged facilities in both national and state forests. With nearly $4,000,000 invested, the parks were upgraded to include shelters, open-air ovens, garbage cans, fuel, drinking waters, and other accommodations for summertime campers.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 46, Apr 1938, p6-7, il
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