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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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29 results for "Buncombe County--History"
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Record #:
27818
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Biltmore Estate Industries began in the late nineteenth century with an instructional woodworking class taught by Charlotte Yale and Eleanor Vance, and supported by Edith Vanderbilt. In the early 20th century, Yale and Vance expanded the reach of these classes to teach mountain women how to produce finer wool fabric. Biltmore Estate Industries demonstrated how popular and viable commercial weaving could be for the Asheville area. Following George Vanderbilt’s death, ownership changed hands and the material produced by the women came to be known as Biltmore Homespun. Today, the industry is owned and operated by the Blomberg family who purchased it in the 1950s.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 10, March 2017, p30, 32, 34, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27278
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Two buildings in Asheville’s downtown were affectionately called “Asheville’s Odd Couple” during the mid-twentieth century. Both built in 1924, the Westall Building and the Jackson Building have different architectural styles, Gothic Revival and English Norman combined with Spanish Romanesque, respectively.
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Record #:
36454
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Western North Carolina played an important role in the state’s economic and occupational development, through its railroads delivering raw materials such as lumber and mica across the state. Pictorial evidence Western Carolina University preserves includes the accompanying photo of the Great Smoky Mountain Railroad. Through such endeavors, acknowledgment of railroads’ place in North Carolina history chugging along.
Record #:
23906
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In 1975, Elvis Presley performed three shows in Asheville. Residents and attendees of those concerts remember Presley's visit as they prepare for celebrating the event's 40th anniversary.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 9 Issue 4, July/Aug 2015, p48-50, 52-53, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24130
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During the twentieth century, open-air farmers markets contributed the Asheville's development. The most prominent of the markets spread along South Lexington Avenue between Walnut Street and Broadway. Today, Asheville's Urban Trail celebrates the history of the market with pieces of art commemorating the importance of this place in Asheville's growth.
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Record #:
26923
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Joseph M. Gazzam built the Kenilworth Inn in 1890, following a tourist boom in Asheville due to the completion of the Western North Carolina Railroad 10 years prior. The hotel featured a number of amenities and had a prime location overlooking the Swannanoa River. Unfortunately, in April 1909, the hotel burnt to the ground, but in 1923, it was rebuilt and reopened as a resort hotel.
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Record #:
26926
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The building that once housed Asheville’s former Plonk School of the Creative Arts was built in 1925 and originally served as the headquarters of the Asheville Women’s Club. In 1941, the building became home to the Plonk School until 1964 when the school closed its doors. The building is now being divided into single family dwellings, but the exterior will still reflect the building’s history.
Record #:
24003
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Asheville's Buncombe Turnpike connected thousands of drovers from Tennessee and North Carolina to South Carolina's railroads. The turnpike provided French Broad River residents with a way to get their herds across the river. Eventually, the West Asheville Bridge was constructed in 1911 to the flood of traffic across the French Broad River.
Record #:
24001
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Joyce Kilmer was an American poet, writer, and Sergeant, and is remembered in this article that details his impressive scouting operations into dangerous territory and his subsequent death in 1918 at the hands of a German sniper.
Record #:
24011
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The Mountaineer Inn is an icon in Asheville; it sprang up after WWII and became a popular motel that is still privately owned today.
Record #:
24024
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The author traces various artistic interpretations of Western North Carolina's landscapes since the 18th century, focusing primarily on William Bartram, who traveled throughout the area in 1775. The painter and botanist observed customs and traditions of the Cherokee, publishing his accounts as 'Travels' in 1791.
Record #:
24611
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Abstract:
During World War II, David Finley, the first director of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. needed a sanctuary for the fine art in the gallery. Finley turned to his friend Edith Vanderbilt, who willingly agreed to hide these rare pieces of art at the Biltmore Estate. Painstaking effort ensured that the pieces were hidden and stored in a room with steel vaulted doors and steel barred windows. Some pieces kept at the Biltmore included Gilbert Stuart’s portrait of George Washington, Raphael’s Portrait of Bindo Altoviti, and Titian’s Venus with a Mirror.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p40-42, 44, 46-47, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24072
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Vance Monument pays tribute to Zebulon Vance (1830-1894), the governor of North Carolina during the Civil War. Vance was also later a United States Senator.
Record #:
22706
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Abstract:
In the Appalachia Region of North Carolina, views on the secession from the United States at the start of the American Civil War were varied. For Watauga and Buncombe counties, culture and geography played a role in which side a community supported. Patterns in enlistment show that the higher elevations were more likely to be Unionists because of their disconnect with the slave economy.
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Record #:
24084
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The author discusses the time period from the close of the Civil War through the first years of the 20th century, specifically focusing on significant events in Asheville during the time period known as the 'Gilded Age.' The author focuses on the McKee family and their time at the historic Smith-McDowell House.