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8 results for "Blue Ridge Parkway--History"
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Record #:
27312
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Blue Ridge Parkway was constructed during the middle 20th century to connect the Shenandoah National Park in Virginia to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina. Many homesteads were relocated due to eminent domain and the process of roadway construction. Many left behind belongings and furniture now considered folk art. These pieces of folk art can be seen on display in Asheville at the Asheville History Center as part of the Blue Ridge Parkway Exhibit.
Record #:
24038
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author presents arguments for why the Blue Ridge Parkway, a 469-mile road between North Carolina and Virginia, provides for a strong community. The Blue Ridge Parkway Foundation has funded over 3.7 million in programs and projects centered on the Parkway.
Record #:
23736
Abstract:
The 496-mile Blue Ridge Parkway is a paradigm of landscaping and engineering genius. The authors discuss the history of the parkway and some of the more notable stops.
Source:
Record #:
12413
Abstract:
Begun in 1935, the Blue Ridge Parkway is within a day's drive of eight states and the District of Columbia. In 1984 alone, over 19 million people traveled the roadway. This article presents some of the history of the first fifty years.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 43 Issue 8, Aug 1985, p16, 18, 20, 22, il
Record #:
16140
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Blue Ridge Parkway began as a Public Relief Project during the Great Depression. The objective was to supply jobs for destitute North Carolinians and to link Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountain National Parks. Once approved by President Roosevelt, debates erupted over the proposed route the parkway would take.
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Record #:
31347
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Blue Ridge Parkway was a project designed to link the Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains national parks, and to provide jobs for the unemployed. While many people supported the parkway, there were various arguments over the parkway’s expenses and routes. This article discusses the history of the Blue Ridge Parkway and how it was constructed.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 9, Sept 1985, p9-11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
24483
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Blue Ridge Parkway was not the first scenic road in the region. Dr. Joseph Pratt (1870-1942) mapped the Crest of the Blue Ridge Highway, a route planned in 1909 that went along much of the southern spine of the Blue Ridge.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 8, January 1978, p10-11, il, por
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Record #:
13767
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Blue Ridge, a historic barrier to travel, is being pierced by a 55-mile-per-hour super highway which sets new rules in road building.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 43, Mar 1952, p6, 12-13, f
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