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15 results for "Blue Ridge Parkway"
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Record #:
36992
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For the February event spotlighted, it was called a “snow moon,” for the November event highlighted it was called a “supermoon.” Pictures taken of the moon in places like Asheville’s Pack Square and DuPont State Recreational Forest proved that, whether the moon was seen in the city or out in the county, it offered a spectacular view of lunar phenomena.
Record #:
23942
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In autumn, the Blue Ridge Parkway bustles with people and the leaves explode with color. From the Cumberland Knob near Mount Airy to Cherokee, the parkway passes a number of beautiful overlooks with spectacular views of the landscape.
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North Carolina Field and Family (NoCar S 1 N672), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Fall 2015, p26-27, 29, il, por
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Record #:
24614
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The Blue Ridge Parkway, built by the Works Progress Administration, was intended to be a pleasant driving experience and a way to travel from Shenandoah National Park to Great Smoky Mountains National Park. In North Carolina, there are 25 tunnels on the Blue Ridge Parkway, ranging in length from 150 feet to 1,434 feet long.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p140-144, 146, 148, 150, 152, 154, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24038
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The author presents arguments for why the Blue Ridge Parkway, a 469-mile road between North Carolina and Virginia, provides for a strong community. The Blue Ridge Parkway Foundation has funded over 3.7 million in programs and projects centered on the Parkway.
Record #:
24199
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Amidst skyrocketing land values and a building boom, many fear that the tourism industry in the western highlands could suffer. Places like the Blue Ridge Parkway and Tweetsie Railroad have seen a decline in tourism the past couple of years.
Record #:
5378
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Ellis describes ten stops along the Blue Ridge Parkway that provide memorable viewing for fall foliage, including Cumberland Knob (Milepost 217), Julian Price Memorial Park (Mileposts 295-298), and Mount Pisgah (Milepost 409).
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Record #:
728
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The Blue Ridge Parkway is a remarkable engineering feat, and one of the most popular attractions in the Southeast. It's not likely we could build it today.
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Record #:
35726
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Human designed crafts of wood and glass could be found in the Parkway Crafts Center, which the author notes began as a home for textile tycoon Moses Cone. As for nature’s craftsmanship, Moose suggested that could be found in the Craftsman Trail nature walk and forest containing trees such as shagbark hickory. For visitors interested in camping, boating, fishing, horseback riding, and carriage riding, she included information about the nearby Price Campground.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p32-33
Record #:
24483
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The Blue Ridge Parkway was not the first scenic road in the region. Dr. Joseph Pratt (1870-1942) mapped the Crest of the Blue Ridge Highway, a route planned in 1909 that went along much of the southern spine of the Blue Ridge.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 8, January 1978, p10-11, il, por
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Record #:
35679
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Walking was recommended as part of backpacking and hiking experiences. For the best experiences, the author suggested considering supplies, rental prices, the pack’s weight, and ways to avoid littering. Sites such as Morrow Mountain State Park, the Blue Ridge Parkway, and Mount Mitchell were recommended. Included were tips for new backpackers and hikers.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p20-23
Record #:
10599
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Looking Glass Rock, located in the Pisgah National Forest in Transylvania County, is one of the premier attractions to be found along the Blue Ridge Parkway in the North Carolina mountains. Tourists can view the granite monolith from the Parkway or get a closer look on a Forest Service road that encircles the dome. Trails maintained by the Forest Service also allow visitors the opportunity to hike to the summit of Looking Glass Rock.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 1, June 1970, p10-11, 31, il
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Record #:
10609
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In a ceremony held at Waterrock Knob in June of 1970, Representative Roy A. Taylor of the 11th N.C. Congressional District officially dedicated a mountain to the late R. Getty Browning, a location engineer for the N.C. State Highway Department who became known as The Pathfinder for the Blue Ridge Parkway. Browning Knob, as the previously unnamed mountain is now known, is marked by a commemorative plaque mounted on a large native boulder.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 4, July 1970, p17,20, il
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Record #:
10631
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The National Park Service has finalized its plans for the forthcoming extension of the Blue Ridge Parkway into Georgia and will be seeking public comments at a meeting in Canton, GA on November 17, 1970. Maps of the approximate route, including the locations for visitor centers and campgrounds, will be available at the conference and officials will be on hand to answer questions. Progress to date consists of an aerial survey of the route, financed by Georgia and North Carolina in 1969, and the determination of precise right-of-way lines for a portion of the approximately 100 mile route.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 12, Nov 1970, p9, 22, il, map
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Record #:
30360
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Travel to the most visited tourist attractions in North Carolina--the Blue Ridge Parkway and Great Smoky Mountains National Parkway--have exceeded 6,000,000 persons in 1953. This new record exceeded 1952 by over 700,000 visitors.
Record #:
32395
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Author Carl Sink outlines a wide variety of things to do and see in the mountains of North Carolina in the spring and summer of 1948. Dozens of new sites and activities have been added with an increase in motel accommodations, road improvements and increased access to natural areas.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 48, May 1948, p3-4, il
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