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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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34 results for "Asheville--Description and travel"
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Record #:
24003
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asheville's Buncombe Turnpike connected thousands of drovers from Tennessee and North Carolina to South Carolina's railroads. The turnpike provided French Broad River residents with a way to get their herds across the river. Eventually, the West Asheville Bridge was constructed in 1911 to the flood of traffic across the French Broad River.
Record #:
24004
Abstract:
AsheVillage Institute is a nonprofit that helps people reconnect with nature by building knowledge and skills about growing food sustainably and taking care of the environment.
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Record #:
24014
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The author presents the various ways artists over a span of 200 years in Western North Carolina have used the medium to inspire others to protect the wilderness in order to instill a sense of place, home, and community in the region.
Record #:
24072
Author(s):
Abstract:
Vance Monument pays tribute to Zebulon Vance (1830-1894), the governor of North Carolina during the Civil War. Vance was also later a United States Senator.
Record #:
24092
Abstract:
The Estes-Winn Antique Car Museum is housed in a building that used to be used for the production of fabric. Now, Asheville locals can visit the Museum to examine restored cars from early-to-late 20th century.
Record #:
24100
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Abstract:
The author describes his experience floating above the western North Carolina mountains in a hot air balloon with Asheville Hot Air Balloons, a company that has offered balloon rides in the area for years.
Record #:
24094
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Abstract:
The author discusses the various waterfalls to be found in the Western North Carolina mountains. Those waterfalls include Linville Falls, Alarka Falls, Dry Falls, and Mingo Falls.
Record #:
24144
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article features why Asheville in Buncombe County is popular with locals and tourists alike. The county is not only a hub of business and enterprise, but also home to countless forms of entertainment and tourist attractions.
Record #:
24656
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the heart of the Hill Country in North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Asheville, Burnsville, Hot Springs, and Black Mountain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p16-19, 49, il
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Record #:
22535
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asheville offers many relatively economical options for a day or weekend away at the spa. Locations include the Shoji Retreat, Spa Theology, The Secret Garden Inn & Spa in Weaverville, and accommodations at the Four Points by Sheraton.
Record #:
28534
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Asheville Tool Library lends tools to members who are unable to purchase the tools on their own or are unable to maintain their storage. The group is concerned about sustainability and making resources available to those who cannot afford them on their own. The library has common tools, semi-professional tools, and camping gear and is looking to host community workshops and classes soon.
Record #:
28586
Author(s):
Abstract:
The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission and N.C. State University are tracking black bear movement in and around Asheville. This study is groundbreaking because it studies the habits of urban bears. Biologists have set up traps throughout Asheville and has collect3ed data on 153 different bears over the past three years by outfitting them with GPS radio collars, tattooing the bears, and attaching ear tags. The study will help determine if Asheville lies along a dispersal corridor for bears, as well as a source or sink population bears.
Record #:
28588
Author(s):
Abstract:
The history of Fred Seely’s Biltmore Industries in Asheville is detailed. The business started in 1901 as Biltmore Estate Industries and earned a reputation for some of the finest handwoven fabric in the nation. The business is no longer in operation today but is part of a museum open to visitors in Asheville detailing the history of the business and the craft movement.
Record #:
29666
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asheville, North Carolina has seen a tremendous surge in locally owned businesses, art galleries, and art studios in the last decade. The city's downtown also features a vibrant nightlife, along with upscale dining and accommodations, bringing an urban-feel to the mountain top.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 2, Feb 2008, p50-51, por