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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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3 results for "African Americans--Social life and customs--Christmas"
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Record #:
36319
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Kooner signifies the connection between Africa and the shore that African slaves landed on. The masked tradition remains a tribute to African-European-American Indian-Caribbean peoples.
Record #:
36318
Author(s):
Abstract:
Because of a resurgence of interest in the topic, this article was reprinted from an earlier journal (See 19.4 1971:160-172).
Record #:
8596
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 19th-century, Wilmington and other coastal towns in North Carolina claimed one of the most unusual ways of celebrating Christmas. The celebration mixed Halloween and Christmas traditions and involved groups of eight to ten slaves who paraded through their communities in grotesque costumes on Christmas morning, singing, chanting, and dancing. They were called “Kooners” or the “John Kooners.” The custom was unheard of in other parts of the country. The parades were performed between the 1850s and the 1880s and always ended with the passing of a hat for donations.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 12, Dec 1976, p6-7, il