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20 results for "African Americans--History"
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Record #:
27319
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Abstract:
Hood Tours explore Asheville’s African-American history in the areas of arts, environmentalism, and entrepreneurship. The educational experience covers both past and present African-American history with particular attention given to E.W. Pearson (1906-1946) who was a prominent historical figure in Asheville.
Record #:
30655
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New African-American heritage trails are making history come alive by linking North Carolina places to historic contributions and pivotal events. Many of the trails pertain to African-American culture, art and music, or the underground railroad. This article provides descriptions of trails offered in Jacksonville, Halifax, New Bern, Wilmington, Winston-Salem, and Raleigh.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Apr 2014, p44-45, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
23758
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Mamie Thompson Gumbs is the director and founder of Forest City museum MaimyEtta Black Fine Arts Museum and Historical Society and works to shed light on the black experience in the South.
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Record #:
30864
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Until only a few years ago, few knew much about the first black Marines, or even that they trained in North Carolina. A museum is housed at today’s Camp Johnson in Jacksonville, where the first recruits attended boot camp in the 1940s. At the museum, visitors see what the men’s living quarters looked like, artifacts, and photographs.
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Record #:
8763
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In 1880, when Richard Etheridge became the first African American in command of a life saving station, the Pea Island Life Saving Station on North Carolina's Outer Banks, the four white crewmen quit. Etheridge was free to choose a crew possessing the best qualities of a lifesaver. The crew was all African American, the first such in the history of the service. Led by Etheridge, the men earned a reputation for skill and courage in saving lives during a time of prejudice and racial tension, until the station was decommissioned in 1947. Harrison recounts the station's finest hour, the rescue of the captain, his family and crew, from the schooner E. S. Newman, on the night of October 11, 1896. One hundred years later, on March 5, 1996, Etheridge and his crew were posthumously awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal, the service's highest peacetime honor.
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Record #:
28244
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Prominent historian Dr. John Hope Franklin of Duke speaks out on the real work of ending discrimination. Franklin believes that apologizing for slavery and injustices done to African-Americans is not enough. Franklin also discusses the politics of slavery and the post-Reconstruction era. Topics covered in the interview include the Wilmington race riots, race relations, the taking down of statues of racist individuals, and his family's history.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 16, April 2007, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
7961
Abstract:
In the 1880s southern politicians began turning against newly freed African Americans and passed many restrictive laws against them. African Americans in North Carolina faced a dilemma--stay and face discrimination or move to an unknown life somewhere else. Many chose to go North. Between 1900 and 1940, over two million African Americans left the South. North and South Carolina and Virginia topped the list of immigrants. The McKinleys discuss the life they made for themselves in the North. Since the 1970s, many have been returning, and North Carolina has been one of the most popular states to come back to.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p28-30, il, por
Record #:
4851
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Goshen, in Jones County, was one of the first African American towns settled at the close of the Civil War. The author recounts the history of the community gleaned from visits with Goshen resident Hattie Brown, who learned the history from her grandmother.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2000, p27-29, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
4137
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Abstract:
The Outer Banks Pea Island Lifesaving Station was the nation's only station manned by African Americans. Operating from the late 19th-century until 1947, when machines made rowboats obsolete, the surfmen aided over 30 distressed ships and saved over 200 people. Their most famous rescue was saving the crew of the hurricane-ravaged schooner E.S. NEWMAN on October 11, 1896.
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Record #:
4163
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Several members of the Pea Island Life-saving station, including the station keeper, were dismissed for negligence in 1879. When Richard Etheridge, an Afro-American, was placed in command, the remainder of the white crew quit, and Etheridge was free to choose a crew possessing the best qualities of a lifesaver. The crew was all Afro-American. Their service in saving lives earned them a reputation for skill and courage.
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Record #:
3854
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On March 7, 1998, at Durham's Hayti Heritage Center, the North Carolina African American Network on Historic Preservation was established. The organization seeks to preserve buildings and sites that are relevant to African-American history.
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Record #:
30753
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In 1981, small business owner and civil rights activist Eddie McCoy began an African American oral history project in Granville Co, NC. While not a trained historian, McCoy’s interviews stand apart from other oral history projects with respect to the insight and perspective he could elicit from his subjects, which possible reflects his own membership within the surveyed community.
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Record #:
3174
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Afro-Americans during the antebellum period consisted of two groups: slaves, who were considered property; and free Blacks, whose rights, such as voting, were limited by the Constitution of 1835.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Fall 1996, p14-15, il, por
Record #:
2323
Abstract:
In 1880, the Outer Banks Pea Island Lifesaving Station was the nation's only station entirely manned by Blacks. Led by Richard Etheridge, the men earned a reputation for skill and courage during Reconstruction, a time of prejudice and racial tension.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1995, p2-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1656
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mattye Reed, founder, curator, and director of N.C. A & T State University's Mattye Reed African Heritage Center, was honored by the North Carolina Folklore Society with its Brown-Hudson Folklore Award.