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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for "African American quiltmakers"
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Record #:
36380
Abstract:
Different patterns on quilts made by African Americans used to be a form of communication in the Underground Railroad. Ten to twelve different patterns were used to inform fugitive slaves as to what their next action should be. Although quilting patterns are no longer used for these purposes, patterns are still very important within African American quilting communities.
Record #:
4411
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bold colors, strip construction, and improvisation are characteristics of quilts made by Afro-Americans. Colorful quilt materials are sewn together in strips; then the strips are sewn together to make the quilt. Quiltmakers may start with a pattern, but they often vary it to suit themselves. Scholars feel this Afro-American quiltmaking style is influenced by their African heritage.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 27 Issue 2, Spring 1988, p27-28, il, bibl
Full Text:
Record #:
31107
Author(s):
Abstract:
Research and the passing down of family stories have revealed many aspects of the secret signaling used to help slaves flee to freedom. One of the secret communication systems is the Underground Railroad Quilt Code. Symbols such as flying geese or monkey wrenches represented directions and tools required for the journey.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 2, Feb 2003, p18-20, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27972
Author(s):
Abstract:
The African American Quilt Circle (AAQT) is the winner of a 2010 IndyWeek Triangle Art Award. Founded in Durham in 1998 the 60 member group’s work has been featured in magazines, cultural exhibits, television programs, and at the National Humanities Center. The mission of the group is to preserve the tradition of quilting in the African-American community. The group also gives back to the community through donations, teaching opportunities, and community building activities.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 29, July 2010, p14 Periodical Website
Record #:
36383
Abstract:
The Farmer-James collection of quilts was a traveling exhibit from January 20-March 14, 2003. It included 37 quilts ranging from Civil War era to the mid-twentieth century. It showcases the difference between folkloristic and artistic treatments of quilt making traditions.