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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for Wilson, Kenneth A
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Record #:
9437
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When the first English settlers arrived on Roanoke Island in 1584, they found tidelands teeming with muskrats. Long before that, Native Americans had been using the animal for food and clothing. Wilson discusses its present range in North Carolina, life history, management, predators, and competitors. Fur dealers also trap the muskrat, and in the 1974-75 trapping season, muskrat peltries made up 25 cents of every dollar in the North Carolina fur trade.
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Record #:
6671
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Alligator weed is an exotic plant that is getting a chokehold on the state's waterways. It is harmless looking with a hollow stem and opposite dark green leaves. However, it provides a breeding place for mosquitoes, plugs ditches and creeks, impedes drainage and navigation, destroys wildlife habitat, and poses a threat to agriculture. Wilson discusses what is being done to control this invasive plant. The article includes a map locating the state's known alligator weed infestations.
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Record #:
6636
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Once estimated at several hundred thousand in colonial North Carolina, the beaver was extinct across the state by the late 19th-century. In 1938, 29 beavers were released on what is now the Sandhills Wildlife Management Area in Richmond County. In 1955, the estimated beaver population was around 5,000. Wilson discusses the history of the beaver in North Carolina and its effect on the landscape.
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Record #:
6677
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The otter is a sleek, elongated package of muscular energy with brains and playful disposition. Once facing the threat of extinction in the state, the otter has made a comeback and today produces valuable pelts. About 95 percent of the existing otter population is found in the coastal area of North Carolina, with the remainder scattered through the Piedmont counties in the Yadkin River watershed.
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