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9 results for White, Gwen A
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Record #:
3031
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Tyrrell County is the state's smallest in size and population, with forestry, agriculture, and fishing supporting a meager economy. County planners seek to improve this situation by developing eco-tourist attractions and attracting sportsmen.
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Record #:
5818
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The travel industry generates over $134 million in Pitt County each year. Since the Pitt/Greenville area has no natural attractions, like mountains and beaches, Bivins discusses what draws visitors to the area.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 61 Issue 5, May 2003, p38
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Record #:
8605
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The last major storm to strike the Outer Banks was on Ash Wednesday, March 5, 1962. The devastating storm destroyed hundreds of beach homes, as well as a large percentage of protective sand dunes from Dare and Currituck counties up to the Virginia state line. Wind gusts up to seventy miles per hour were recorded at Nags Head. At Southern Shores, sand drifts covered houses up to the roof tops. Although property damages totaled $12 million, only two people lost their lives. The National Weather Service declared the storm to be an abnormality, and no major storms have devastated the Outer Banks since.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 9, Feb 1983, p21-22, il
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Record #:
8827
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Remnants of the pound net, originally used by Croatan Indians and depicted in John White's drawings, can still be seen in North Carolina rivers of today. The pound nets of today are more sophisticated, but still lead fish into a trap and hold them there. A full size net is on display at the North Carolina Marine Resources Center on Roanoke Island.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 12, May 1981, p22-23, il
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Record #:
9128
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On October 11, 1896, the E.S. NEWMAN, a three-mast schooner out of Stonington, Connecticut, was caught in heavy storms off the Virginia coast. Captain S.A. Gardiner ordered the ship be beached in the \"Graveyard of the Atlantic,\" and a warning rocket be fired. At the time, Captain Richard Etheridge and his crew, all of whom were black Americans, were at the Pea Island Lifesaving Station, two miles north of the wreck. Although Etheridge had no lifesaving equipment, he and his crew were able to rescue the ten aboard during the dangerous storm currents. Etheridge was born in Dare County in 1842 and was in charge of Pea Island until his death in 1900.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 6, Nov 1976, p19-20, il, por
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Record #:
12268
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Lake Mattamuskeet, eighteen miles long and six miles wide in coastal Hyde County, was once drained as a part of one of the greatest American agricultural experiments of the 20th century. The lake bottom is said to contain seventy-five square miles of the richest soil in the world, rivaling that of the fertile Valley of the Nile. Ultimately, heavy rains ruined the multi-million dollar project.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 12, May 1975, p23-25, 36, il
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Record #:
12331
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Dr. William L. Garlick, a retired chest surgeon from Maryland, resides in Buxton on Hatteras Island. He began coming to Hatteras in 1936. White discusses his most unusual hobby for a North Carolina location - growing orchids.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 3, Aug 1974, p31, il
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Record #:
31403
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The ironclad warship U.S.S. Monitor sank off the North Carolina coast in 1862 while being towed to Beaufort for an attack on Wilmington. In 1973, researchers located the Monitor shipwreck southeast of Cape Hatteras. Follow-up expeditions resulted in the designation of the Monitor shipwreck as the nation’s first national marine sanctuary.
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Record #:
31509
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Rip currents claimed thirteen lives at the Outer Banks during the summer of 1980. Nags Head responded to last summer’s problems by adopting an ordinance allowing officials to close the beach if rip tides threatened swimmers again. This article recognizes several heroes who saved swimmers’ lives last summer, and discusses how to recognize rip currents.
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