NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


19 results for Weir, Lula M
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
11466
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weir recounts the life of James Larkin Pearson, the Wilkes County poet. He has experienced wealth and poverty, fame and ridicule, but through it all has continued to write and create. Once unhonored and unsung in North Carolina, he is today esteemed at home and abroad.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 31, Dec 1933, p11, 22, por
Full Text:
Record #:
11500
Author(s):
Abstract:
Founded in 1877 in Elkin, by the late Alexander Chatham and his brother-in-law Thomas L. Gwyn, Chatham Blanket Mills, now Chatham Manufacturing Company, is one of the oldest textile mills in North Carolina. The original plant had 284 looms and a capacity of 80,000 pairs of blankets per week. Chatham blankets are known world-wide today.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 35, Jan 1934, p17, por
Full Text:
Record #:
11608
Author(s):
Abstract:
Colonel Jack Martin, a hero of the Revolutionary War and one of the two first settlers in Stokes County, built one of the most interesting houses there. Known as the Rock House, its foundation was laid in 1770. It was a huge undertaking. Built on a knoll, the house stood four stories, and the walls were three feet thick. Though the house is in ruins today, it still attracts thousands of visitors annually.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 2, June 1934, p11, 22, il
Full Text:
Record #:
11634
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Tory Oak, which is located in the town of Wilkesborough in Wilkes County, is probably the most historic tree in North Carolina. The tree was used to hang five Tories after the Battle of Kings Mountain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 6, July 1934, p2, il
Full Text:
Record #:
13921
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stone Mountain is generally regarded as one of the scenic wonders of western North Carolina and rises more than 700 feet from a base which is five miles in circumference.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 13, Aug 1950, p8-9, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
13987
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the few remaining country doctors left in North Carolina, Dr. Jefferson Davis Bulla of Randolph County is still going strong at 89.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 41, Mar 1951, p11, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
13994
Author(s):
Abstract:
The old colonial Covington home located between Danbury and Walnut Cove, Stokes County, is one of the most interesting places of residence in northwestern North Carolina. It was built 131 years ago and is gradually being restored to be one of the show places of the county.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 43, Mar 1951, p10-11, f
Full Text:
Record #:
14422
Author(s):
Abstract:
Six year old Bobby Nell Cooper finds the hills of rural Wilkes County a distinct contrast to the bright lights of Beverly Hills and Hollywood, where she has captured the hearts of stage and move audiences since she was a tiny tot and appeared repeatedly on the radio.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 21, Oct 1947, p9, 29, f
Full Text:
Record #:
14477
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Japanese cherry blossoms in Washington and the roses of Picardy have long been famed in story and song, but none of these excels in beauty like the apple blossoms in the mountains of western North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 46, Apr 1948, p9, f
Full Text:
Record #:
14491
Author(s):
Abstract:
For 28 years, a large part of the population of Surry County has been greeted upon arriving in this world by Martha Dobson, a midwife who has traveled around the mountain county to deliver babies.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 2, June 1945, p9, f
Full Text:
Record #:
14999
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the grandest of all scenic spots in North Carolina, Grandfather Mountain, may soon be taken over as a state park.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 39, Feb 1943, p23, 29, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
15358
Author(s):
Abstract:
Elkin native Ms. Willie Guyer operated the Elkin Roller Mill, the only woman in the state to be an mill operator. She began her work as a bookkeeper for the mill until her father purchased the plant and placed her in managerial control. She supplemented her business with sale of fertilizer in spring and coal during fall and winter.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 52, May 1938, p17, 35, por
Full Text:
Record #:
15386
Author(s):
Abstract:
Simon Dixon moved from Pennsylvania to Alamance County and constructed a mill on Cane Creek. The 1751 still operated in the 1930s and was reportedly the state's oldest operational mill. Folk tales about buried treasure near the mill brought thrill seekers and prospectors in search of silver and gold.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 13, Aug 1935, p7, il
Full Text:
Record #:
15399
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weir describes Pilot Mountain. Located in Surry County, it is 2,700 feet above sea level and 1,500 above the surrounding countryside. It stands isolated, the sole survivor of other mountains that have eroded away. Over the centuries it has served as a guide to both Native Americans and wilderness travelers, like Daniel Boone. Within the past five years it has become accessible to motorists through the completion of a road to its base.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 28, Dec 1934, p7, 20, il
Full Text:
Record #:
15410
Author(s):
Abstract:
Miss Inez Davis of Winston-Salem is among the first do be a part of the newest profession for young girls - the stewardess or hostess of modern transport planes. One of the requirements for the new position is that the applicant must be a graduate registered nurse, but once in the position, it affords an opportunity to not only travel but meet people, even celebrities.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 11, Aug 1936, p3, 24, f
Full Text: