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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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49 results for Watson, Alan D
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Record #:
2380
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In January, 1816, Wilmington merchant John Fanning Burgwyn wrote to an unidentified person a detailed prospectus describing the port, river navigation, and exports and imports. The document is in the New Hanover County Public Library in Wilmington.
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Record #:
2395
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Although the 1995 General Assembly defeated a lottery bill, colonial settlers held legislatively authorized ones. The first was held in 1759 to raise money for church construction. Others supported community needs and supplemented tax revenues.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 1, June 1987, p7, 25, il
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Record #:
3235
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Colonial travel in the lower Cape Fear region was by water and often slow and hazardous. As the population spread inland, a system of roads, bridges, ferries, and taverns developed. Since counties provided the upkeep, some routes were better than others.
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Record #:
5488
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Railroading began in England in 1825, and by the 1830s, had reached North Carolina, offering a shipping alternative to turnpikes, canals, and steamboats. By 1860, 834 miles of track had been laid. Watson discusses the rise of railroads in the years leading up to the Civil War.
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Record #:
9036
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Russellborough, now part of the Brunswick Town State Historic Site, was home to governors Dobbs and Tryon from 1758 until 1770. The last resident was William Dry who saw the house burned by Lord Cornwallis and Sir Henry Clinton in 1776. Dry died in 1781 and was buried in St. Phillip's churchyard at Brunswick.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Sept 1978, p22-23, il
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Record #:
9226
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In 1821, Dr. James Smith, Vaccine Agent for the U.S. government, accidentally introduced smallpox to Edgecombe County, killing ten people. Smith accidentally sent the live virus instead of the vaccine to doctors in the area, leading to the repeal of a national vaccine law of 1813 that had permitted the vaccine to come to the county.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 2, July 1979, p12-14, il
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Record #:
9963
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The first intercolonial roadway through North Carolina completed in 1727, roughly paralleled U.S. 17. Most of the principal towns and tourist goals which attract north-south travelers along the Coastal Highway today were already stopping places in pre-Revolutionary times.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 7, Dec 1973, p9-11, il, por, map
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Record #:
15921
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The first printing press arrived in 1749 with James Davis, public printer. Following the American Revolution, a singular printer would increase to at least twenty-two and extend printing technology throughout the state. Printing meant distribution of newspapers and the state's first was North Carolina Gazette first printed in 1751 by Davis.
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Record #:
17743
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The author disputes Martin Rozear's claim that the first established hospital was in Portsmouth 1846-1847, an article that appeared in the previous issue of this journal. Watson pulls from fragmentary evidence to argue the first designed hospital was privately funded and built in Wilmington during the mid-1830s. This facility closed sometime in the late 1830s.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 7, Oct 1997, p41-43, il
Record #:
17737
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Abstract:
Pilots directed ships through the often tricky inlet system separating state rivers from ocean-going commerce. Specifically, the history of Ocracoke pilots and legislation governing them is presented.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 3, Oct 1993, p20-25, il
Record #:
17805
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Abstract:
Public health policy was managed at a local level throughout much of the state's history. Wilmington serves as a case study because of public health policy development for several reasons. The city's need for a health program for its citizens was compounded because of its continually growing population throughout much of history and its role as a bustling port. A history of public health concerns and local officials reactions are reviewed in this article.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 15, October 2008, p27-39, il
Record #:
18577
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Abstract:
Watson discusses the life and death of former North Carolina governor Benjamin Smith. Although despised by many, Smith's generosity provided over 20,000 acres to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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Record #:
19524
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In response to the smallpox epidemic in other parts of the United States, North Carolina took action to safeguard its inhabitants by instituting an approach to public health similar to towns like Boston. Watson discusses the development of public health in the state in response to smallpox and the evolution of preventative measures.
Record #:
21079
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A study of the society and economy in colonial Edgecombe County from 1730 to 1775 brought about by a then current interest in historical demography, developments in historical geography in Colonial North Carolina launched by H. Roy Merrens, and the large repository of county records which, at the time of the article's writing, had not been mined of their potential. The article relies heavily on inventories of estates in conjunction with other county data.
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Record #:
21098
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This article investigates the nature of orphanages in colonial North Carolina using Edgecombe County as a case study. A prominent issue was the lack of close supervision of guardians who often embezzled from orphans' estates or neglected orphans' educations. In other cases, orphans had no estates and were apprenticed to masters to learn a trade. While there were advantages to those orphans who had estates, treatment of the children varied with the guardian or master.