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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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12 results for Turner, Walter R
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Record #:
4010
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In the 1940s, three Charlotte-based airlines--South East, Twentieth Century, and State--struggled for a place in the emerging airline industry. None was successful, although State remained in business until 1980. Failure to win authorization for local service from the Civil Aeronautics Board, which eventually authorized Piedmont Airlines, was a factor in their demise.
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Record #:
4490
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At the Wilmington airport on February 20, 1948, Piedmont Airlines founder Tom Davis watched the first flight of his fledgling airline take off. Davis was almost 30, and his airline consisted of three used DC-3 airplanes and 250 employees. Forty years later Piedmont was one of the nation's largest airlines before its acquisition and merger with USAir in the late 1980s.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 10, Mar 2000, p70-71, 74-75, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4688
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Road building held a low priority in North Carolina until the beginning of the 20th-century. The implementation of Rural Free Delivery (RFD), the North Carolina Good Roads Association, and the affordable Model T Ford made road construction a necessity. During the 1920s, through the efforts of Gov. Cameron Morrison and State Highway Commission Chairman, Frank Page, the state became nationally known for its outstanding highway system.
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Record #:
5746
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Tom Davis founded Piedmont Airlines in 1948. When he retired in 1983, the Winston-Salem-based airline was known \"for safety, customer service, and a family atmosphere among its workers.\" Piedmont was one of the nation's largest airlines before its acquisition and merger with USAir in the late 1980s.
Record #:
6227
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Turner recounts the story of Thomas H. Davis, a native of Winston-Salem, and how he built Piedmont Airlines into one of the nation's largest airlines. In the late 1980s, Piedmont was acquired by USAir.
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Carolina Comments (NoCar F 251 C38), Vol. 49 Issue 5, Sept 2001, p104-112, il, bibl Periodical Website
Record #:
7012
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People associate the automobile industry with northern cites, but in the early 20th-century over 100,000 automobiles were assembled in North Carolina. Turner discusses the history of the first Model A Ford Town Sedan purchased in Winston-Salem in 1931.
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Record #:
9209
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In 1929, Greensboro native Mary Webb Nicholson became the first licensed female pilot in North Carolina. She learned to fly at Raven Rock Flying School in Portsmouth, Ohio. Nicholson flew with the British Air Transport Auxiliary during World War II and was killed in 1943, when the engine on her plane failed. Too low to the ground to parachute, she died trying to land the plane.
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Carolina Comments (NoCar F 251 C38), Vol. 55 Issue 3, July 2007, p109-115, il, por, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
21690
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This article examines the development of the airport at Charlotte between 1978 and 1989 through its association with Piedmont Airlines. The airline was able to demonstrate the positive effect of an air transportation hub in Charlotte in the face of public doubt. After Piedmont Airlines merged with US Airways in 1989, the Charlotte Douglas International Airport is still a regional hub for air travel in the South.
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Record #:
24320
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Charlie Bell is president and CEO of Triad International Maintenance Corporation (TIMCO), an aircraft maintenance company. The company strips down planes for cargo and passenger carriers and gives them an upgrade.
Record #:
7080
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Trains were a major form of travel in the state in the early 20th-century, but by 1921, North Carolinians owned over 136,000 automobiles. The most popular car was the Model-T, because of its reasonable price and reliability. North Carolina dirt roads, however, often impassable in wet weather. Turner discusses the work of Harriet Berry, whose work in the 1920s led to legislation that created all-weather roads in the state. As the decade closed, another type of transportation emerged -- the airplane.
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Record #:
7351
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Samuel Spencer, a Georgia native, was the first president of the Southern Railway and one of the country's railroad leaders. Founded in 1894, the Southern Railway Company controlled over 4,500 miles of track across the South. To keep the equipment repaired, the company built a large repair shop in Rowan County in 1896 and named the location Spencer. It is the only one of North Carolina's railroad towns named for a railroad man. Turner discusses three decisions Spencer made in early life and how they affected North Carolina.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Spring 2005, p30-33, il, por
Record #:
22705
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In the 1920s, North Carolina became known as the Good Roads State, with concrete highways connecting large cities, county seats, and major institutions via a peak in bus companies. By the 1930s, three large bus companies emerged: Queen City Coach Company (Charlotte), Carolina Coach Company (Raleigh), and Camel City Coach Company (Winston-Salem). With steady growth and finance, these companies became part of then national networks for Trailways and Greyhound.