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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Stephens, Erwin D
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Record #:
9138
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Connie B. Gay of Wake County was born on a 17-acre farm. By the 1950s, Gay owned fourteen radio stations. The first to operate a country music station in a large metropolitan area, Gay's gross fortune was estimated by THE WASHINGTON POST to be $50 million. Gay sold his businesses and retired to homes in Florida and Virginia in 1972.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 5, Oct 1976, p26-28, il, por
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Record #:
9333
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Jake Beattie has made nearly 2,000 colored slides of four to five hundred species of flowers native to North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 2, July 1974, p25, 32, il, por
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Record #:
9381
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Leonard J. Presnell grows Nepeta Cataria, an herb commonly known as catnip, on an experimental basis in Watauga County. Catnip yields approximately 3,000 to 3,500 pounds to the acre at an average of 43 cents per pound. The herb was originally used making tea for medicinal purposes.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 8, Jan 1975, p12, por
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Record #:
9745
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Orice A. Ritch of Charlotte is one of the most active railroad hobbyists in the Southeast. The first model he built was a miniature of the Hudson 4-6-4 locomotive, which took him ten years and $600 to complete. The engine is six feet long and runs on a half-mile track on a twenty-acre lot. Ritch hosts monthly meetings, and people from all over the East Coast attend either to run their own live steam engines or simply to watch.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 2, July 1975, p14-16, il
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Record #:
10080
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Farmers once waited until after the “sheepshearing rain,” a period in late April/early May when spring showers were through, to sheer their sheep so the “de-wooled” animals might not become chilled and develop sickness. Modern day farmers like Arthur Gambill from near Sparta in Alleghany County generally sheer the animals of their wool by feel, whenever the weather seems warm enough.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 12, May 1974, p24-25, por
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Record #:
12256
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Water dowsing, the practice of locating underground water through divining with a Y-shaped branch or metal device, is generally met with skepticism, but Russian scientists claim that hydrokinetic energy is nothing mystical.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 10, Mar 1975, p21-22, il
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Record #:
12265
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The Myers Park Optional Traditional School in Charlotte brings a traditional approach to teaching children that, in addition to maintaining a curriculum focusing on fundamental academic skills, stresses manners, individual responsibility, and patriotism. The school has attracted national attention by proving that traditional concepts still work.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 12, May 1975, p16-19, il
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Record #:
9054
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This article presents a letter from A. Gentry, a member of the 1854 North Carolina legislature, to his wife. The letter presents the problems of communication between Raleigh and the western counties at that time.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 10, Mar 1979, p25
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