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17 results for Siler, Leon M
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Record #:
9922
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Abstract:
The Asheville School for Boys, opened in 1900 by Newton Mitchell Anderson and Charles Andrew Mitchell, allowed female students to enroll for the first time beginning with the 1971-1972 school year. Fifteen students, all from Asheville's recently closed St. Genevieve of the Pines school for girls, enrolled in the first year of co-ed operations with twice again as many registered for the 1972-1973 school year.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 7, Sept 1972, p10-11, il, por
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Record #:
9945
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The U.S. Forest Service is spending more than $200,000 to improve visitor accommodations at the Pisgah National Forest's Sliding Rock. Planned improvements include new dressing and shower rooms, three layers of observation decks, and a parking lot for fifty cars. The natural waterslide, which is a few miles south of the Blue Ridge Parkway, has attracted visitors for as long as anyone can remember and its popularity has recently increased many times over with the airing of a Lassie television show that featured the famous collie taking a trip down the slippery rock.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 16, Feb 1973, p17-18, il, map
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Record #:
10086
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Flying fire patrols took the place of the old fire towers that once loomed over state and national parks in North Carolina. The hourly patrols are much less costly than the old-style watchmen who man towers round the clock. In addition, some old WWII bombers have been used to fight forest fires in North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 2, June 1971, p13-14, por
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Record #:
10599
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Looking Glass Rock, located in the Pisgah National Forest in Transylvania County, is one of the premier attractions to be found along the Blue Ridge Parkway in the North Carolina mountains. Tourists can view the granite monolith from the Parkway or get a closer look on a Forest Service road that encircles the dome. Trails maintained by the Forest Service also allow visitors the opportunity to hike to the summit of Looking Glass Rock.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 1, June 1970, p10-11, 31, il
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Record #:
10606
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Abstract:
Due to cooperation between private companies and public interests, phosphate mining wastes, or tailings, are having less of a negative impact on the environment in North Carolina. Legislation to protect streams and rivers from pollution was enacted in 1964 and the Minerals Research Laboratory of North Carolina in Asheville has been offering its assistance to mining companies since 1946. As a result, substantial contributions have been made towards conserving and enhancing the overall value of North Carolina's natural environment and its mineral resources.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 3, July 1970, p10-11, 36, il, por
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Record #:
10618
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The Cherokee Boys Club motto is \"Jobs, Training, and Recreation for Cherokee, N.C. Indian Youth.\" The club is made up of present and former students from Cherokee High School and it currently has approximately 350 members, 70 of which are full-time employees. Government contracts for services such as school bus operation and maintenance, school lunchroom management, and garbage collection provide the club with most of its revenue.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 8, Sept 1970, p8-9, il, por
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Record #:
10631
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Abstract:
The National Park Service has finalized its plans for the forthcoming extension of the Blue Ridge Parkway into Georgia and will be seeking public comments at a meeting in Canton, GA on November 17, 1970. Maps of the approximate route, including the locations for visitor centers and campgrounds, will be available at the conference and officials will be on hand to answer questions. Progress to date consists of an aerial survey of the route, financed by Georgia and North Carolina in 1969, and the determination of precise right-of-way lines for a portion of the approximately 100 mile route.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 12, Nov 1970, p9, 22, il, map
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Record #:
10679
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Abstract:
The Asheville Federal Building, once known as the Grove Arcade Building, is home to the Environmental Data Service, a division of the Environmental Science Services Administration, or ESSA, which is itself a division of the United States Department of Commerce. The Environmental Data Service, or EDS, provides answers to environmental questions submitted by individuals or groups. The EDS also issues publications dealing with climatology in an effort to reduce their work load by anticipating some of the questions that may be asked throughout the year. A staff of approximately 600 people uses several computers, data punch cards, microfilm and magnetic tape, and millions of sheets of typed, printed, and handwritten information to answer submitted questions. The sheets of handwritten information alone are filed on ten miles of shelving.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 6, Aug 1969, p8-9, 22, il
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Record #:
10717
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Abstract:
The Chattahooga River, which runs through western portion of our state, is apt to become much more familiar to North Carolinians through its projected inclusion by Congress in a system of National Wild and Scenic Rivers. The system will be modeled on the current network of national parks and national historic monuments with which many North Carolinians are familiar. Governors of the four states through which the river runs have given their public support for the river's inclusion, as have representatives from many outdoorsmen's organizations.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 15, Jan 1970, p8-9, il
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Record #:
10726
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Western North Carolinians, listening to the fury of public argument over the My Lai massacre in Vietnam, hear distinct echoes of a similar, equally heated controversy that swirled up from the recesses of mountainous Madison County in 1863. In Madison County's Shelton Laurel 13 civilians, kneeling alongside Shelton Laurel creek, were shot by a Confederate firing squad commanded by Lt. Col. James A. Keith for suspicion of burglary and pillaging a Confederate depot at Marshall, the county seat.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 17, Feb 1970, p9-10, il
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Record #:
10737
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Siler profiles Peter Hanlon, who is the supervisor of North Carolina's four national forests - Croatan, Uwharrie, Pisgah, and Nantahala. He has held forestry positions in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. His domain in North Carolina stretches 450 miles east to west and includes over one million acres.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 20, Mar 1970, p10-11, 24, il, por
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Record #:
10778
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The Pigeon River Road, running between Cove Creek, North Carolina and the Tennessee border, took ten years to complete and was one of the most difficult road-building projects ever undertaken by the state. Builders carved almost the entire twenty-one miles out of the mountainsides.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 8, Sept 1968, p9, 34-35, il
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Record #:
10806
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Among North Carolina's 100 counties and 650 cities and towns, there is one \"dependent sovereignty\" with a Principal Chief. The sovereignty is the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, proprietors of a 56,000-acre Western North Carolina wooded realm. The Principal Chief is Walter Jackson, born a Cherokee in 1924 and promoted by his fellow tribesmen in 1967 to the highest distinction an Indian can attain. Siler discusses the state's most unusual form of government and how it functions.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 17, Feb 1969, p8-10, il, por
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Record #:
10956
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Abstract:
Two twin bridges each 1,050 feet long and 220 feet high span the Green River Gorge in Henderson County. The bridge is the state's highest river crossing.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 22, Apr 1968, p11, 22, il
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Record #:
12274
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Abstract:
The congregation of Barbecue Church in Harnett County built their first manse more than two centuries after Presbyterian Scots founded the church. The storied past of the church includes Revolutionary war anecdotes and a host of colorful pastors, many of whom preached in Gaelic during the church's earlier years.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 3, July 1971, p10-11, il, por
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