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12 results for Shelley, Rowland, M
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Record #:
9074
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In Part 4 of endangered wildlife, reptiles are categorized. The status of these species is based on federal definitions for endangered, rare, undetermined, and peripheral species. Information includes the species; its range in North Carolina; preferred habitat; general comments about it; and status.
Record #:
9367
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Isopods are animals with seven pairs of legs, have a body divided into three parts, and display a variety of shapes and colors. One can roll-up into a complete ball when disturbed. They are not insects, but belong to a group of animals called Crustacea. Over a dozen species reside in North Carolina. Shelley describes several of them.
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Record #:
2523
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Although the state has an indigenous scorpion, accidentally transplanted scorpions from Florida and the southwestern United States have been found in the state since 1991, for example, in Wake, Dare, and Nash Counties.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 21, Dec 1994, p45-55, il, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
9021
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The Endangered Species Committee of the Department of Natural Resources has compiled a list of endangered plants and animals in North Carolina. The status of these species is based on federal definitions for endangered, rare, undetermined, and peripheral species. Information includes the species; its range in North Carolina; preferred habitat; general comments about it; projects, such as dams, that might affect it; and status.
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Record #:
9040
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In Part 2 of endangered wildlife, birds are categorized. The status of these species is based on federal definitions for endangered, rare, undetermined, and peripheral species. Information includes the species; its range in North Carolina; preferred habitat; general comments about it; and status.
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Record #:
9042
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Part 3 of endangered wildlife contains a list of mammals considered by the Endangered Species Committee to be either rare or endangered in North Carolina. May are simply on the edge of their normal range, while others are being jeopardized by habitat destruction.
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Record #:
9205
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Scorpions are among the world's most easily recognized creatures through their renowned stinging apparatus. In this country they are most abundant in the Gulf states and southwest. The only species native to North Carolina is Vejovis carolinianus. It is universally dark brown, as opposed to the Florida species which are striped.
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Record #:
9470
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Leeches are highly specialized worms and are related to earthworms and a group of marine worms called polychaets. Most live in shallow water, but some have adapted to a terrestrial environment. One terrestrial leech, Haemopis septagon, inhabits North Carolina in the swamps and moist floodplains of the eastern Piedmont and Coastal Plain. It was discovered in 1972 and is one of the newest additions to the state's known fauna.
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Record #:
30054
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This report presents a survey of the freshwater (unionid) molluscan fauna of the piedmont portion of the Cape Fear River System in North Carolina. The abundance and diversity of mollusk species were compared across the Neuse, Tar, and Cape Fear drainages. Photographic plates and diagnostic comments are provided to facilitate identification of unionids.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 13, July 1987, p67-89, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
Record #:
10003
Abstract:
One terrestrial leech, Haemopis septagon, inhabits North Carolina in the swamps and moist floodplains of the eastern Piedmont and Coastal Plain. It was discovered in 1972 and is one of the newest additions to the state's known fauna. Large earthworms appear to be the primary food source.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 1, Mar 1979, p129-134, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
9454
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The distribution of white pines in North Carolina is in the western Piedmont and mountainous counties; however, in the Piedmont, along the Rocky and Deep rivers in Chatham and Lee counties, a stand of white pines exists. The authors describe this stand which is one hundred miles east of its natural range.
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Record #:
30140
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The millipedes of the Kings Mountain region of southern North Carolina were sampled to determine seasonal variation in faunal composition. Three species are unique to the Kings Mountain region, but this region also shares eight species with the eastern Piedmont and five with the Appalachian Mountains.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 4, Dec 1980, p1-42, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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