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42 results for Richards, Constance E
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Record #:
6921
Abstract:
The Southeast Animal Fiber Fair, in Fletcher, is the largest event of its kind held in the southeastern United States. Now in its eleventh year, the fair “strives to support local small farms, businesses, and crafters by providing a forum for educating the public about the fiber arts and fiber production.” For shoppers the fair is an opportunity to purchase hand-knit sweaters, hats, scarves, and other items and to observe demonstration booths of looms, spinning wheels, and wool dyeing.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p140-142, 144, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6925
Abstract:
Asheville is known for its downtown art galleries and craft shops. Along the French Broad River is the city's industrial riverfront containing rows of warehouses. Here, over the past decade, artists have been converting the old buildings into studios. The area is known as the River Arts District. Currently there is a thriving community of over forty-five artists and artisans working there, including potters, quilters, and painters.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 6, Nov 2004, p38-40, 42-43, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6997
Abstract:
The ASHEVILLE CITIZEN-TIMES named Dr. Olson Huff, a developmental pediatrician, as one of the 100 most influential citizens of Western North Carolina in the 20th-century. Huff is widely known for his advocacy for the health and safety of children and for his activism in voicing concerns and finding solutions for those who are too small to be heard.
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Record #:
8938
Abstract:
Burnsville, county seat of Yancey County, is Our State magazine's Tar Heel town of the month. The town was named for Otway Burns, a privateer during the War of 1812. Mining mica and gems, flax cultivation, wild ginseng collecting, and logging supported Burnsville during the 19th-century, but retail and tourism industries propel the town's economy today. Tourist attractions include the McElroy House, NuWray Inn, DK Puttyroot and The Orchid Tearoom, and Lil Smoky's Drive-in & Restaurant.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 1, June 2007, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
9448
Abstract:
Richards discusses the work of wood turning artisans Steve Noggle and Alan Hollar.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p124-126, 128, 130, 132, 134, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9604
Abstract:
West Asheville was an incorporated town until 1917, when it merged with Asheville. For most of its existence, it was a working class neighborhood, but it is now emerging into a combination of young families, budding entrepreneurs, immigrants, longtime residents, and a vibrant, artistic community. Richards discusses some of the attractions, including the West End Bakery and Café, Sunny Point Café and Bakery, Burgermeister's Kitchen and Tap, The Lazy Susan, and the Blue Barnhouse.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p174-176, 178-179, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22217
Abstract:
Andrew Snavely opened Dobra Tea on Asheville's Lexington Avenue in 2010. He travels the world searching for the leaves, buds, and flowers that are later steeped at his shop. Among the places where he has collected are Laos, Japan, India, China, and Taiwan. He not only brings back the tea, but also more knowledge of this ancient beverage and its cultural ties.
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Record #:
22282
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Root & Vine, located in an historic 1901 building in Morganton, was launched by first-time restaurateurs Brian Miller and Aimee Perez. Their goal is "to present locally sourced ingredients in creative ways." Richards relates how this young eatery is progressing.
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 7, Sept 2012, p61-63, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22292
Abstract:
Restaurateur and chef Joe Scully and partner Kevin Westmoreland opened the popular Corner Kitchen in Asheville's Biltmore Village in 2004. This fall they have opened a new restaurant, Chestnut, on Biltmore Avenue in downtown Asheville. Scully discusses the new venture.
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Record #:
22293
Abstract:
Rachael Vickers baked her first cheesecake at age eleven, and it has developed into her signature confection. In 2011 she launched Rachael's Delectables, which makes many flavors of the cake. She set up shop at the Blue Ridge Food Ventures shared-use kitchen in Candler and has been quite successful in her newly started business.
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Record #:
22307
Abstract:
Once an exclusive restaurant in Waynesville, Anthony Wayne's opened to the general public last year. The restaurant, named for a Revolutionary War hero, and its skillful chef Daniel Morris are reviewed by Richards.
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Record #:
22319
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Richards reviews the Vintage House, located in what was once a residence in Hickory's Oakwood neighborhood. She examines the culinary presentations of Chef Matt Parker, who is a graduate of the French Culinary Institute in New York and Le Cordon Bleu in Paris. He purchased the Vintage House in 1997.
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Record #:
22316
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Richards reviews Marco Trattoria, a restaurant located in a former Brevard private home and owned by Shellie and Marc Dambax. Richards relates where Marc acquired his cooking skills for Italian and Mediterranean foods, dishes served, and Sallie's creativity in art.
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 3, May 2012, p74-75, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22322
Abstract:
Chef Bill Greene, a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America who perfected his skills at some of the country's finest restaurants, operates Artisanal, an unassuming wood building located on the grounds of Banner Elk's Diamond Creek Golf Club. Richards review the restaurant.
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Record #:
22326
Abstract:
Owners Toni and Kaighn Reynolds left the Atlanta culinary scene for the mountains where they opened Frogs Leap Public House in Waynesville. Richards reviews the restaurant and specialties of executive chef Kaighn.
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 8, Oct 2012, p70-71, il, por Periodical Website