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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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15 results for Rauschenberg, Bradford L
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Record #:
21865
Abstract:
This article presents information on a Masonic punch bowl made by the Bow factory in London for 'Halifax-Lodge/North-Carolina' that was part of a 1767 order for four Bow China bowls. This example is the first time a documented reference has been found specifying an order of Bow porcelain decorated especially for the American market. Archival and archaeological information on the bowl and its owners along with a diagnostic analysis of the bowl as an example of Bow porcelain are included.
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Record #:
21880
Abstract:
This article examines a rare group of 'Liverpool-Type' transfer-printed creamware and pearlware pitchers or 'jugs' made for known individuals in the Pamlico and Albemarle Sound areas of eastern North Carolina dating between 1795 and 1810.
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Record #:
21888
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This article discusses Andrew Duche, an 18th century potter who worked with porcelain while traveling through North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Reputed to be one of the South's earliest stoneware producers, Duche was also heavily involved in Southern politics during his travels throughout the region.
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Record #:
21907
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This article examines the production of tin-glazed ceramics in Salem, North Carolina and other parts of the country. Tin-glazed ceramics were first introduced to the Moravian community in Salem by Carl Eisenberg near the end of the 18th century.
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Record #:
21904
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This article provides additional information to the article 'American Vernacular Furniture and the North Carolina Backcountry,' which appeared in the November 1994 issue of the Journal of Early Southern Decorative Arts. After the original article's publication, several additional pieces of furniture relating to the original set of furniture discussed.
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Record #:
21920
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This article examines a series of 305 gravestones carved between 1803 and 1845 in Davidson County, North Carolina. During the course of examination two distinct styles of carving became apparent, Baroque and Gothic.
Record #:
27570
Abstract:
An inkstand made by John Bell in 1825 is the first inscribed American tin-glazed pottery to be discovered. The tin-glaze technique was introduced by German potter Carl Eisenberg who visited Salem, North Carolina in 1793. Since tin-glaze was so uncommon at the time, many questions remain unanswered regarding Bell’s apprenticeship, influences, and products.
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Record #:
27581
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One of the earliest marked examples of southern salt-glazed stoneware is a jug produced by B. Duval & Company in Richmond, Virginia. Owned by apothecary Benjamin Duval, the company manufactured pottery to complement Duval’s medicine business. The jug is now on display at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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Record #:
27583
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Neoclassical and Empire are two major styles of brass andiron produced in Charleston, South Carolina. These two styles were brought to light through an analysis of Charleston brass founders conducted at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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Record #:
27612
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In the collection of the South Carolina Library in Columbia, South Carolina, is an armchair made for the Royal Governor’s ceremonial use in the first State House. The chair survived a disastrous fire and is a rare example of an unrepresented period of Charleston’s chair-making. Some of the chair’s emblems are often seen on furniture from the Albermarle region of North Carolina.
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Record #:
27711
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina conducted a study of coffin-making in Charleston to learn more about Low Country burial customs. The study showed varied roles of Charleston woodworkers in the undertaking process, but scanty documentation and lack of actual coffins for examination leave much of their involvement to conjecture.
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Record #:
27724
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Brass andirons, fenders, and candlesticks have surfaced and reattribute the materials discussed in a 1979 essay. New patterns and features on the items expand the repertoires of the andiron groups. The materials were produced in Charleston, South Carolina and are in collection at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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Record #:
27865
Abstract:
Research by the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina found new records on the apprenticeship system, trade guilds and material culture in Carolinas. The records are of convicts, indentures, redemptioners, enslaved African American and American Indian labor and apprentices.
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Record #:
36182
Abstract:
The author gives the accepted definition of an antique as an artifact, made with human hands that is more than 100 years old. He elaborates on provenance, high-style vs. folk art, style, joinery and skill of the craftsman.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 16 Issue No. 3, , p2-6, il
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Record #:
36335
Abstract:
The author gives the accepted definition of an antique as an artifact, made with human hands that is more than 100 years old. He elaborates on provenance, high-style vs. folk art, style, joinery and skill of the craftsman.
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