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4 results for Pitts, Charles O., Jr
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Record #:
4513
Abstract:
Confederate spy Emeline Jamison Pigott was the most famous of the seven Pigott sisters, who were born in Carteret County between 1828 and 1842. Pitts reconstructs some of the family's history to show contributions made by the other sisters to Carteret County's heritage.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 14 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 1998, p8-11
Record #:
5609
Abstract:
Episcopal minister David D. Van Antwerp organized Beaufort's Parish of St. Paul's in the mid-1850s and shortly thereafter began missionary efforts to local Afro-Americans. He met with opposition, but continued his work, as did subsequent pastors. In 1887, St. Clement's Colored Episcopal Church was built. The church continued until 1967, when it united with the congregation at St. Paul's.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 13 Issue 1-4, 1997, p10-12
Record #:
34698
Abstract:
This article discusses the intersection of two Carteret County residents—Confederate General Robert E. Lee and Elizabeth Oakes Prince Smith, the mother of the infamous Appleton Oaksmith. Lee was responsible for the inspection of forts in North Carolina, and in 1840, arrived at Beaufort. While Lee would spend the next year fortifying Fort Macon, he left for New York City in 1841. At the same time, Elizabeth Oaksmith and family resided in New York City where she met General Lee. The two met and conversed on bravery and their long-term dreams. Eventually, Oaksmith would move to Carteret County where she later wrote on her memories of the General.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p3-5
Record #:
34763
Abstract:
The Stella, North Carolina, post office was first operated by German immigrant William Kuhn. Kuhn came to North Carolina to work as a book keeper for a local mill operation. Purchasing land near Stella, he opened a general store which doubled as the local post office. Another Carteret County post office, located in Mill Creek, was staffed by members of the local Quaker community during the mid-19th century.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2008, p14-15, il