NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


11 results for Olds, Fred A
Currently viewing results 1 - 11
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
22142
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article discusses the Colonial and Revolutionary Period artifacts and documents housed in the Hall of History at the Agricultural Building in Raleigh. The items found in the Hall pertain North Carolina's history and culture.
Full Text:
Record #:
22552
Author(s):
Abstract:
Formed along side the colonial precincts, parishes became the religious divisions of North Carolina from 1715 to 1778. An Act in 1715 created nine parishes and encompassed all the leading men in the province as parish councilmen; this was amended in 1741 to include 16 parishes, and again in 1751 when vestrymen were to be elected. The number of parishes continued to grow as North Carolina grew as a colony. However, the whole system was abolished in 1778 although some continued to function into the early nineteenth century.
Record #:
34729
Author(s):
Abstract:
In July, 1917, construction was completed on the breakwater at Cape Lookout. Measuring over two miles in length, the breakwater was built to create safe anchorage for vessels. The breakwater itself is approximately 50 feet in height and constructed from North Carolina granite. Nearby facilities include a Coast Guard Station. While the breakwater was being built, there were numerous other additions to local infrastructure including a new school house, an increase in farms and farm acreage, and creation of new Menhaden fish factories.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p14-15, il, por
Record #:
34730
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Outer Banks north of Cape Lookout boast the highest number of Coast Guard Stations—25 in total. The most dangerous stretches of coast are guarded by the Cape Lookout and Portsmouth stations. The town of Portsmouth is nestled at the northern end of Portsmouth island across the inlet from Ocracoke. Inhabited by 150 people during the early 20th century, the town contains a Coast Guard station, Methodist church, and village store. Residents keep sheep and chickens while wild ponies roam the island. Some of these are trained by Coast Guardsmen, who use them to patrol the beach during nightly watches.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p16-18, il, map
Record #:
34743
Author(s):
Abstract:
The breakwater at Cape Lookout was first constructed in 1915 as a means of improving harbor safety. Constructed from North Carolina quarried granite, the stone was brought by train from Raleigh to Morehead City. From there, it was transported eleven miles to the dumping point on scows and derric boats in 1,000 ton loads. The breakwater measured approximately 100 feet in length and cost 3.5 million dollars to build. Construction took 18 months and involved over 30 vessels carrying materials to site.
Source:
Record #:
34739
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carteret County consists of the “down east” Outer Banks and North Carolina mainland. Sandwiched between two bodies of water, the county runs nearly 90 miles in length. Atlantic, a town on the mainland, is the gateway to Beaufort and the remainder of the County, which stretches from Portsmouth Island south to Bogue Banks. Various towns in the county are littered along the shoreline including Otway, Davis, and Oyster Creek. Residents on the mainland grow a number of crops, including cotton, corn, soy beans, sweet potatoes, and sorghum.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2005, p13-14
Record #:
34752
Author(s):
Abstract:
Written in 1921, this article describes Cape Lookout at the “lonesomest” place in the world. Prior to the First World War, Cape Lookout was a bustling harbor undergoing improvements. With the war effort, however, construction of a breakwater stopped and many residents returned to Harker’s Island on the Core sound. Returning to the community, the author notes that many of the fishermen have abandoned the Cape Lookout fish stock because of its poor value. As one of the most dangerous shoals, the Cape Lookout Coast Guard station is outfitted with radio service. The guardsmen had rescued 30 vessels between 1911 and 1921.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p9-10, il
Record #:
34761
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beaufort’s early history is fairly tumultuous. Early engagements with the Tuscarora left the small community scarred. Further encounters with pirates in 1731 and Spanish raiders in 1741 delayed, but did not stop, settlement. By the early 1830s, a local courthouse and fort had been erected while Fort Macon was under construction. Today, Beaufort’s eastern part faces the inlet; nearby are the Cape Lookout lighthouse and associated Coast Guard Station. The oldest areas of town include an 18th century cemetery and house which dates to 1723.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2008, p12-13, il
Record #:
34767
Author(s):
Abstract:
A “rum-chaser” boat was purchased for use at the Beaufort Coast Guard Station in 1925. Intended to patrol for vessels bringing alcohol into the state, the boat could reach speeds of 25 miles per hour. As other vessels averaged between 8 and 12 miles per hour, the guardsmen were confident that the vessel could overtake all others on the water. Other additions to local infrastructure included ongoing construction of the Cape Lookout breakwater and expansion of the Norfolk southern railway to the Cape region.
Source:
Record #:
34766
Author(s):
Abstract:
The town of Beaufort, nestled on the Outer Banks, is the origins of the Inland waterway. This maritime route extends into the Neuse River, where it joins the Pamlico Sound. Traveling north, mariners can follow the Pamlico into the Albemarle and Chesapeake Bays. To move between Beaufort and Norfolk, Virginia, a system of canals linking the rivers and sounds was created. In 1925, canal expansion was underway to link the Alligator River and Cape Fear River into this inland waterway, bypassing the Pamlico Sound and the capes of the Outer Banks, respectively.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Fall-Spring 2008/2009, p3-5, il, map
Record #:
35019
Author(s):
Abstract:
Efforts to boost the local economy encouraged leaders to establish businesses such as Orion Knitting Mills. This business, open from 1914 until 1984, was well known not just for providing jobs for women in the area as it was its original location. Because of the high elevation point, the business later purchased by J.H. Johnson Jr. and Harry Saunders and re-born as Johnson-Saunders Dry Cleaners became known to denizens as “Knit Mill Hill.”
Source:
Subject(s):