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14 results for Oesterreich, Bryan A
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Record #:
6186
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Claude Howell is considered the father of the arts in Wilmington. In the 1950s, he started the art program at Wilmington College, now known as UNC-Wilmington, and was its director for over twenty years. Oesterreich discusses Howell's life in and beyond Wilmington, the influences on his artistic career, and his creations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 6, Nov 2003, p25-26, 28-29, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6641
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First built in the Croatan Sound in 1857 and disassembled in 1955, the Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse was rebuilt on the Manteo waterfront and opened to the public in 2004. The original lighthouse was lost when the barge taking it to Edenton capsized and sank. The structure was a screwpile lighthouse, so called because of the screw at the end of each piling which allowed it to be literally screwed into the sand beneath the water. Lighthouses of this type were built over water and were designed to allow safe navigation of shipping channels in the sounds.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p66-68, 70, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6646
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Oesterreich discusses three Down East seafood restaurants that have been hooking coastal visitors for years. They are Sam & Omie's (Nags Head); Sanitary Fish Market (Morehead City); and River Forest Manor (Belhaven).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p130-132, 134-135, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6699
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Bryan Oesterreich now teaches English at East Carolina University and Carteret County Community College. A high school dropout, Oesterreich drove a tractor-trailer for twenty years, until a back injury in 1990 ended his driving career. He discusses his career change at age 42 and where it has led him.
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Record #:
6733
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At its peak North Carolina's rail system included over 5,200 miles. With the advent of the interstate highway system, bigger trucks to haul freight, more people driving, and better local roads, railroad routes declined and fell into disuse. Now through the efforts of North Carolina Rail-Trails(NCRT), organized in 1988, these railroad beds are getting a second lease on life as pathways for hikers, bicyclists, and horseback riders. Currently, there are twenty-eight rail-trail locations across the state either in operation, development, or in the planning stages.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 2, July 2004, p100-102, 104-106, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6750
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Washington, county seat of Beaufort County, is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month. Colonel James Bonner named the Pamlico River settlement for George Washington in 1776. Oesterreich describes this town which is committed to preserving its past while investing heavily in the future. The city has recently transformed its waterfront area, building new boat docks and reconfiguring traffic patterns. Moss Landing, on the site of the old Moss Planing Mill, is a planned $30 million residential and commercial development.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p18-20, 22, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
6757
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Potatoes are a profitable crop in North Carolina's coastal counties because the soil there is fertile and potato-friendly. Currently around 17,500 acres are under cultivation. The potato crop generates between $15 million to $17 million into the local economies of Beaufort, Camden, Carteret, Currituck, Hyde, Pamlico, Pasquotank, Tyrrell, and Washington Counties. During a five-week harvest season, Pat McCotter, of Vandemere, will ship between fifteen to twenty tractor-trailer loads a day.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p106-109, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6927
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Oesterreich discusses how the town of Manteo's waterfront underwent a change from the 1970s, when it was an industrial docking location with massive aboveground fuel storage tanks, to today's picturesque harbor of waterfront condos, shops, restaurants, the Roanoke Island Festival Park, bike paths, and boardwalks. The creation of the 20-year plan for change involved citizens, professors and students from the North Carolina State University School of Design, and state and local officials. Almost every goal in the plan was met. The Manteo Way of Building is one of the most studied town planning models in the nation.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 6, Nov 2004, p106-108, 110, 112, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7132
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Oesterreich describes three specialty shops that offer interesting alternatives to the usual purchase. They are the Tuba Exchange (Durham); the Silver Thimble Shop (Swansboro); and the Chicago Old Telephone Company (Sanford).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p36-41, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7188
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The annual Rogallo Kite Festival, held for the past twenty-three years at Jockey's Ridge State Park in Nags Head, honors Francis and Gertrude Rogallo. A NASA engineer, Rogallo, along with his wife, is credited with inventing the flexible wing in 1948. In the 1960s, use of the wing launched the sport of hang gliding. Since 1974, Kitty Hawk Kites has instructed over 300,000 people in the techniques of hang gliding.
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Record #:
7791
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The Roanoke Island Festival Park has two very special venues of North Carolina heritage -- the Adventure Museum and the Outer Banks History Center. The Adventure Museum is a facility designed to provide a hands-on experience for visitors and is set up in chronological order so people can explore the 400 years of Outer Banks history. The museum targets school children in fourth and eighth grade history classes. Students can meet a pirate, dress up in Elizabethan clothing, and learn navigation with 16th-century tools. The North Carolina State Archives administers the Outer Banks History Center that collects and preserves the history and culture of the North Carolina coast. Among the holdings are historian David Stick's extensive collection of Outer Banks' materials, maps, and oral histories.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p118-120, 122, 124-125, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7785
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The Elizabeth II, modeled after the 16th-century sailing vessel that brought the colonists to Roanoke Island, brings early North Carolina history to life. It was constructed for the 400th anniversary of the first colonists' visits to Roanoke Island. Oesterreich describes how the ship was built and his experiences sailing aboard it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p164-166, 168, 170, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8360
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During the Christmas season, Marine Corps Reservists dedicate themselves to bringing happiness to underprivileged children through the Toys for Toys program. The program started in 1947, in Los Angles, California, when Marine Corps Major Bill Hendricks led a group of fellow Marines in collecting and distributing toys. In 1948, the program went national. All Marine Corps Reserve units in North Carolina participate. The Marines receive assistance from local motorcycle clubs, which donate toys or funds, and from corporate sponsors. NBC affiliate WITN-TV in Washington, Beaufort County, has been a program participant for twenty years. In 2005, forty thousand toys were distributed to twenty thousand eastern North Carolina children.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 7, Dec 2006, p124-126, 128, 130-131, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21951
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Oesterreich describes the ECU Storybook Theatre, a program created seventeen years ago by Patricia \"Patch\" Clark, an associate professor in the ECU School of Theatre and Dance. Basically a storybook is chosen and professor and students turn it into a play. The group began performing at Barnes & Noble and later expanded to other venues like Washington's Turnage Theatre and public schools in the surrounding area. In summer of 2012, Clark and some of her students will travel to Iraq to perform.
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