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8 results for Norris, David A
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Record #:
5036
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Dangerous shoals in the Atlantic are now marked by automated lights atop steel towers. Before this, a lightship was the only solution. Lightships were manned vessels with lighted masts moored near dangerous areas to warn mariners. They were first used off North Carolina in 1824, and the last one was replaced at Diamond Shoals in 1966. Norris recounts the histories of several of these vessels.
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Record #:
5340
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During the Civil War many of the escaping slaves who reached the Union lines in Eastern North Carolina later joined the Union Army. In all 5,035 black soldiers from North Carolina made up four regiments. Two of these regiments, the 35th and 36th U.S. Colored Troops, were among the finest black regiments in the Union Army.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 7, Dec 1993, p28-31, il
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Record #:
7370
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Norris traces the history paper currency and coins issued in North Carolina from the time of the Lords Proprietors in 1694 through the Civil War.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p100-102, 104106, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8939
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On April 6, 1917, the United States entered World War I. The war affected life on the home front in North Carolina through conservation of food and gasoline, recycling, women stepping into civilian jobs vacated by men in service, and the planting of over 50,000 victory gardens.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 1, June 2007, p25-26, 28, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9602
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In the late 19th- and early 20-centuries, postcards were an inexpensive way to send messages to families and friends. Norris recounts some of the scenes of North Carolina that were portrayed on them.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p152-155, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10540
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In 1881, the Raleigh NEWS & OBSERVER reported that “there is a perfect rage for Christmas cards.” Norris discusses Christmas card use in North Carolina.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 7, Dec 2008, p130-133, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21612
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In July 1863, Union Brigadier General Edward E. Potter raided the towns of Greenville, Rocky Mount, and Tarboro, North Carolina. This article looks at the planning, execution, and fallout from such small actions, which historians have lauded for their importance in weakening the Confederacy's ability to conduct war through psychological and tactical efforts.
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Record #:
21876
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During the early years of the Civil War, the North Carolina Medical Department, in conjunction with volunteer organization, provided medical care to Confederate troops in both North Carolina and Virginia. While at the beginning of hostilities the North Carolina Medical Department was responsible for field surgery, they transitioned to hospital care and the raising and distribution of relief funds.
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